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Support => General Help & Advice => Topic started by: GG on March 19, 2011, 12:00:02 am

Title: Advice on setting up
Post by: GG on March 19, 2011, 12:00:02 am
Hi,

I'm sick of windows, but can't afford Mac (and prefer Linux anyway). So, I'm considering Ubuntu.
I would like advice on the following things:
How should I set up Ubuntu?
How can I keep Windows in case I don't like Linux?
How best can I keep the ability to read or perhaps standard windows file types (doc, ppt, xls, docx, pptx, xlsx)?
Which apps should I load onto my Linux and is there a package with all the linux essentials?
Is Linux a good idea for me (I'm not big into kernel editting and this would be a personal desktop, but I like the software in general)?
Title: Re: Advice on setting up
Post by: Mark Greaves (PCNetSpec) on March 19, 2011, 12:18:10 am
OK, can I suggest Ubuntu... it will come with a load of pre-installed applicatiions such as OpenOffice, which will be able to read and write the M$ office doc types you mentioned (doc, ppt, xls, docx, pptx, xlsx), a web browser (Firefox), an email client, a photo manager, media players, CD/DVD burning app, messenger client, etc.

Another option would be Linux Mint (http://www.linuxmint.com/) 10, which is based on Ubuntu.. if you decide to go for Mint, can I suggest you get the "Main" edition (with the GNOME desktop).
Some people find Mint slightly easier at first,as it comes with mp3 and flash support already included, these have to be post-installed in Ubuntu (very easy to do though), but I *now* prefer Ubuntu... it's a personal taste thing though, they are very nearly the same thing.

As a matter of fact it will come with MOST of the software you will need already installed, and there's a LOT more you can easily install from within the Ubuntu Software Centre or Synaptic package managers.

A package manager is an application that lists all the software available in the Ubuntu repositories, you just choose what you want, and it will download and install it for you... no searching online, no viruses or malware, and all software that is installed this way will be kept up to date automatically.

The Package manager / Repository system of installing software is one of Linux's major strengths... it is also the thing most people overlook when coming from the Windows world... old habits die hard, and most people when they first try Linux still think they need to search for their software online, download it, then manually install it.

Ubuntu
http://www.ubuntu.com/ (http://www.ubuntu.com/)

OpenOffice (which will already be installed in Ubuntu 10.10)
http://www.openoffice.org/ (http://www.openoffice.org/)

By far the easiest way for you to "test drive" Linux and keep Windows, would be to use the WUBI installer that comes with an Ubuntu LiveCD... Download an Ubuntu LiveCD ISO image from HERE (http://www.ubuntu.com/desktop/get-ubuntu/download), burn it to a CD, then just insert the CD in a PC that is already running Windows, the WUBI installer will autostart, and install Ubuntu into a folder "INSIDE" Windows... this way you can see if you like it, and if not, you can uninstall it from withing the "Add/Remove Programs" Windows control panel applet.

Actually you don't even have to burn it to CD if you don't want to, you can just download the WUBI Windows installer application, run it in Windows, and it will download the ISO image and then install it for you.... see here:
http://www.ubuntu.com/desktop/get-ubuntu/windows-installer (http://www.ubuntu.com/desktop/get-ubuntu/windows-installer)
and for more info on WUBI, see here:
https://wiki.ubuntu.com/WubiGuide (https://wiki.ubuntu.com/WubiGuide)
Be Aware - Be sure to read the Warning on the above link, I'm *fairly* sure it has been fixed now, but it would be advisable to lock the GRUB bootloader version so it doesn't get updated anyway... "just in case"... if you need/want instructions on how to do this, just ask, it's an easy thing to do and could save you some grief in the future.
(if you decide on Mint, you WILL have to burn a CD, they don't do the app that downloads it for you, but it will still install the same way if you insert the CD in a running Windows PC... it would also be a good idea to lock the GRUB version in Mint too).

If you decide you DO like it, you can continue to run it that way, or go for a "proper" installation.
(either keeping or discarding Windows... the choice is your)

a WUBI installation, or a "proper" dual-boot installation will ask you at bootup whether you wish to boot into Ubuntu or Windows.

Or (if your PC can boot from USB)you could run it from a bootable USB stick (LiveUSB)
http://linuxforums.org.uk/general-help-advice/help-me-get-started/msg37362/#msg37362 (http://linuxforums.org.uk/general-help-advice/help-me-get-started/msg37362/#msg37362)
It won't run as quickly this way, but has the benefit of being "portable", ie. you can boot it from any PC that can boot from a USB stick.

More info on what LiveCD's and LiveUSB's are, here:
LiveCD
http://linux.co.uk/index.php/pages/livecd/ (http://linux.co.uk/index.php/pages/livecd/)

LiveUSB
http://linux.co.uk/index.php/pages/usb-key/ (http://linux.co.uk/index.php/pages/usb-key/)

A list of Linux alternatives to popular Windows software, here:
http://linux.co.uk/2010/06/linux-alternatives-to-windows-software/ (http://linux.co.uk/2010/06/linux-alternatives-to-windows-software/)
99% of which will either already be installed, or will be available fro the package managers, along with a LOT more.
(at present there are 32,402 packages available in my package manager)

How was that for a lengthy read ;)

If you have any other questions, just ask :)
Title: Re: Advice on setting up
Post by: GG on March 19, 2011, 03:08:51 pm
OK, I think I'll go for a dual boot of Ubuntu and Windows - how should I go about setting that up?
Title: Re: Advice on setting up
Post by: Mark Greaves (PCNetSpec) on March 19, 2011, 05:02:05 pm
Did you read the above posting ?

Using WUBI to install Ubuntu would be your safest and easiest bet, as it's not going to be altering your partition table... See what I said about using WUBI to install Ubuntu above.

Or if you are intent on a "proper" Ubuntu installation, which will entail resizing your Windows partition...
Go here:
http://www.ubuntu.com/desktop/get-ubuntu/download (http://www.ubuntu.com/desktop/get-ubuntu/download)
Click on the "Start download" button.

Whilst you are on that page, click on the 3 "Show me how" buttons.

Be Aware - ANY operation that edits the partition table carries a small risk of corrupting your partitions, including your Windows one, so back up anything you cannot afford to loose first).

The choice is yours...
Title: Re: Advice on setting up
Post by: GG on March 20, 2011, 08:04:23 pm
Did you read the above posting ?

Yes, but it would be reassuring to have advice on the details...

Using WUBI to install Ubuntu would be your safest and easiest bet, as it's not going to be altering your partition table... See what I said about using WUBI to install Ubuntu above.

As I said, I'd like to properly install Ubuntu (the duel boot option) as I have been led to believe that because WUBI keeps Windows running it slows the computer down.

Or if you are intent on a "proper" Ubuntu installation, which will entail resizing your Windows partition...

Am I to understand that duel boot would mean that neither OS operates at full capacity? I thought that as only one runs at a time, whichever OS is running has full control...

Go here:
http://www.ubuntu.com/desktop/get-ubuntu/download ([url]http://http://www.ubuntu.com/desktop/get-ubuntu/download[/url])
Click on the "Start download" button.

Whilst you are on that page, click on the 3 "Show me how" buttons.

Will I be asked to select from settings (e.g. Kubuntu/Xubuntu/Ubuntu or Memory settings)? as this is what WUBI prompted me for.
If so, what do you recommend?

Be Aware - ANY operation that edits the partition table carries a small risk of corrupting your partitions, including your Windows one, so back up anything you cannot afford to loose first).

The choice is yours...

I thought that the storage of my files was completely independent of OS... what is at risk exactly? All documents and applications or just those in the Windows area?

Thanks in advance for all your help.

Title: Re: Advice on setting up
Post by: Mark Greaves (PCNetSpec) on March 20, 2011, 08:51:09 pm
Quote
I have been led to believe that because WUBI keeps Windows running it slows the computer down.


This is NOT true... WUBI installs Ubuntu to a "Virtual" drive (on your Windows partition)... the GRUB bootloader then EITHER boots the virtual drive OR Windows... Windows is NOT running AT ALL if you boot to Ubuntu... though Ubuntu *may* run "slightly" slower due to it being in a "Virtual" drive".

Quote
Quote from: Mark Greaves (PCNetSpec) on Yesterday at 05:02:05 pm
Or if you are intent on a "proper" Ubuntu installation, which will entail resizing your Windows partition...
=====
Am I to understand that duel boot would mean that neither OS operates at full capacity? I thought that as only one runs at a time, whichever OS is running has full control


You misunderstood what I meant... I meant you will have to resize the Windows partition, so effectively Windows will have less room available to it on the hard drive (Linux will have the full drive capacity because it can read/write to the Windows partition too)... other than that you are correct, you boot one or the other and whichever you boot will have FULL control of the systems resources.

Quote
Will I be asked to select from settings (e.g. Kubuntu/Xubuntu/Ubuntu or Memory settings)? as this is what WUBI prompted me for.
If so, what do you recommend?


No, from that link you will only be offered Ubuntu 10.10 (or 10.04 LTS if you change the option)... if you decide on a WUBI install, select Ubuntu 10.10 32bit

Quote
I thought that the storage of my files was completely independent of OS... what is at risk exactly? All documents and applications or just those in the Windows area?


Unless specifically set up that way (and most Windows systems aren't), your user data and the rest of the system will all reside on the same partition... but even if they ARE on different partitions, when resizing partitions you are manipulating the "partition table"... if the partition table becomes corrupted, the data will still be there on the drive but you will not be able to access it, and would need some kind of data recovery tool to get at it, if it was recoverable at all.

The chances of the partition table becoming corrupted whilst resizing the partitions for a "proper" installation are small, but I thought it best to make you aware of them.... specially if you don't have a Windows CD.

A WUBI installation does NOT change the partitioning scheme AT ALL, it does replace the Windows bootloader, so again there is a small chance that if that went wrong you wouldn't be able to boot your PC, but that would be MUCH easier to fix.
(particularly if you have a Linux LiveCD already burned)

This is NOT a Linux issue, ANY partition operation runs a small risk of corruption.

Now you're aware of the risks, the choice is yours.

Personally I'd agree with you and do a "proper" install, but I have no idea of your technical abilities if anything goes wrong, or if you cannot afford for things to go wrong, (ie. have important data, and or don't have a Windows disk to reinstall with if things do go wrong), so I thought it prudent to point out the small but present risks.



First thing to do... go to that link:
http://www.ubuntu.com/desktop/get-ubuntu/download (http://www.ubuntu.com/desktop/get-ubuntu/download)
and click on the "Start download" button... this will download an Ubuntu 10.10 32bit ISO image (only get the 64bit version if you are SURE you have a 64bit CPU, if unsure stick with the default settings and get the 32bit version... the 32bit version will run on 32bit and 64bit CPU's the 64bit will ONLY run on 64bit CPU's... the ONLY real benefit of the 64bit version is it allows you to run more than 4GB of RAM as long as you have a 64bit CPU)... when it is downloaded, burn it to a CDROM.

THEN you can make up your mind whether to do a WUBI or "proper" installation.

If you want to do a WUBI installation -
Boot to your Windows desktop... once there, insert the Ubuntu LiveCD you just made into your CD/DVD drive... WUBI will autostart and should not need to download anything, because it gets it from the CD.

If you want to do a "proper" Ubuntu installation -
My advice would be to -
1) Click on the "Show me how" buttons on the Ubuntu website and make sure you understand them

2) In Windows, run a complete defrag of your hard drive.

3) Reboot the PC from the Ubuntu LiveCD

4) Follow the instructions you read in the "Show me how" links.

If you have any further questions, fell free to ask. :)

in either case you will need to decide how much room you want to put aside for Ubuntu... this will depend on things like, how big your hard drive is and how much free space is left.



Another option that doesn't require partition changes (so your Widows drive is safe), yet would still allow a "proper" installation would be to get a second hard drive and install Ubuntu "natively" onto that.
Title: Re: Advice on setting up
Post by: GG on March 22, 2011, 04:35:23 pm

This is NOT true... WUBI installs Ubuntu to a "Virtual" drive (on your Windows partition)... the GRUB bootloader then EITHER boots the virtual drive OR Windows... Windows is NOT running AT ALL if you boot to Ubuntu... though Ubuntu *may* run "slightly" slower due to it being in a "Virtual" drive".

and:
Quote
A WUBI installation does NOT change the partitioning scheme AT ALL, it does replace the Windows bootloader, so again there is a small chance that if that went wrong you wouldn't be able to boot your PC, but that would be MUCH easier to fix.
If this is the case, then what advantage does proper installation have over WUBI except for possibly being slightly slower?

Quote
your user data and the rest of the system will all reside on the same partition... but even if they ARE on different partitions, when resizing partitions you are manipulating the "partition table"... if the partition table becomes corrupted, the data will still be there on the drive but you will not be able to access it, and would need some kind of data recovery tool to get at it, if it was recoverable at all.
I will be backing up all of my files beforehand anyway - but if the partition table becomes corrupted will I lose all the disk space my files are occupying?

Quote
The chances of the partition table becoming corrupted whilst resizing the partitions for a "proper" installation are small, but I thought it best to make you aware of them.... specially if you don't have a Windows CD.
and:
Quote
Now you're aware of the risks, the choice is yours.

Personally I'd agree with you and do a "proper" install, but I have no idea of your technical abilities if anything goes wrong, or if you cannot afford for things to go wrong, (ie. have important data, and or don't have a Windows disk to reinstall with if things do go wrong), so I thought it prudent to point out the small but present risks.
My technical abilities are low, but if things go wrong is it not possible to wipe the computer, install Linux from the LiveCD and recover my files from the backup drive I'm using? Although I would then be unable to switch back to Windows, I'm sure in a worst case scenario I'd make do with Linux even if I didn't like it that much (and I'm basically positive that I prefer Linux).

Quote
in either case you will need to decide how much room you want to put aside for Ubuntu... this will depend on things like, how big your hard drive is and how much free space is left.

How will this effect Ubuntu when it runs? Can some of this memory go into the D: Drive? What are the recommendations?

Quote
Another option that doesn't require partition changes (so your Widows drive is safe), yet would still allow a "proper" installation would be to get a second hard drive and install Ubuntu "natively" onto that.

That's worth considering...

Thankyou in advance for your ongoing patience  - I think I'm almost there now.
Title: Re: Advice on setting up
Post by: Mark Greaves (PCNetSpec) on March 22, 2011, 05:23:51 pm
Quote
If this is the case, then what advantage does proper installation have over WUBI except for possibly being slightly slower?

The slight speed advantage, and the fact that a Linux native partition would be (more) immune from tampering by windows malware... ie. it IS *possible* that windows malware could corrupt the WUBI virtual drive, though I've never heard of this happening... Windows can't even "see" a Linux native partition (unless 3rd party software is installed).

It must be said that Windows malware is highly unlikey to be able to *access* the WUBI virtual drives *contents* (the virtual drive contains a Linux native filesystem), but there is a general consensus that it *could* corrupt the Virtual drive itself as it is stored on a Windows filesystem... though as pointed out I've never heard of this happening, it IS (unlikely but) possible that at some point in the future some idiot may write some Windows malware that specifically targets Windows ability to read the WUBI virtual drive, if you see my point.

Think of the Virtual drive as a sealed box that Windows malware can "see" but can't get inside... the *contents* are safe, but the *box* itself could still be tampered with (rendering it unopenable).

Quote
but if the partition table becomes corrupted will I lose all the disk space my files are occupying?

No... it would require the use of some 3rd party software to recover any files you needed (if that worked at all), then for you to format the drive... ie. erase it completely, which would fix the partition table, but you would have to re-install Windows and Ubuntu again from scratch.

Quote
My technical abilities are low, but if things go wrong is it not possible to wipe the computer, install Linux from the LiveCD and recover my files from the backup drive I'm using? Although I would then be unable to switch back to Windows, I'm sure in a worst case scenario I'd make do with Linux even if I didn't like it that much (and I'm basically positive that I prefer Linux).

Yes... See above.

Quote
How will this effect Ubuntu when it runs? Can some of this memory go into the D: Drive? What are the recommendation s?

Very little, Ubuntu will be quite happy in 2GB (but I'd be more tempted to give it at least 10GB)... Ubuntu WILL be able to "see" the Windows partitions so they *could* be used for storage.
The only thing I'm unsure of is how easy it would be to "change you mind" and expand the room you gave a WUBI installation... a proper installation CAN be changed later. (heh, suppose that should have gone in answer 1 ;) )

Quote
That's worth considering...

If you can afford a USB 2.0 (or 3.0 if you have USB 3.0 ports) external USB drive, this would also allow you to carry Ubuntu around with you and boot it from any PC capable of booting from USB (make sure YOUR system can boot from USB fiirt though)... unlike Windows, Ubuntu will be quite happy when booting on different hardware.... obviously it will be slightly slower that if run from an internal drive.
Title: Re: Advice on setting up
Post by: GG on March 22, 2011, 06:51:51 pm
OK, I'm basically finished. One last question: when I run Linux from my CD (without installing it to the Drive) does it change the partitions table, and should I back my files up?
Again thanks for getting me to this stage, I'm feeling confident now!
Title: Re: Advice on setting up
Post by: Mark Greaves (PCNetSpec) on March 22, 2011, 09:01:35 pm
No, whilst running as a LiveCD it makes NO changes to your hard drive AT ALL... unless you tell it to install of course ;)

So select "Try Ubuntu" when asked rather than "Install Ubuntu", and you are 100% safe.
Title: Re: Advice on setting up
Post by: Mark Greaves (PCNetSpec) on March 23, 2011, 05:31:33 pm
Booting from a LiveCD will not allow you to save any system configuration changes such as installing new software, or adding drivers etc. .. because as it runs from RAM, all changes will be lost when you reboot.

If your system is capable of booting from a USB stick...

If you want to run a "Live" session AND be able to save changes, install Ububtu to a LiveUSB (http://linux.co.uk/index.php/pages/usb-key/) stick with persistence...
(again, as long as you select "Try Ubuntu" rather than "Install Ubuntu", this will make NO changes to your hard drive AT ALL)



Instructions for creating a LiveUSB (on a Windows PC)...
Download the Ubuntu LiveCD ISO image from their homepages, then follow the instructions from "Step 2" on this page:

http://www.pendrivelinux.com/put-ubuntu-10-04-on-flash-drive-using-windows/ (http://www.pendrivelinux.com/put-ubuntu-10-04-on-flash-drive-using-windows/)

Just make sure you set a "persistence" file during creation of the LiveUSB... see pic below

(http://linuxforums.org.uk/MGalleryItem.php?id=952)

Then all you have to do is boot from the USB stick, by either setting USB as the first boot device in the BIOS, or hitting the "boot device selection key" when you switch your PC on then selecting the USB stick... usually the F10 key but varies from manufacturer to manufacturer... and when asked, select "Try Ubuntu" rather than "Install Ubuntu" .

If you want instructions for creating a LiveUSB from within Linux, just ask :)

[EDIT]
It looks like the Ubuntu LiveCD now has a (Windows) usb-creator.exe file in the root of the CDROM which I'm *guessing* will create a LiveUSB from the CD's contents.
Title: Re: Advice on setting up
Post by: GG on March 23, 2011, 07:18:41 pm
When I boot with the Live CD in, I get an error message (cannot mount). Is live USB the only option or should a Live CD work?
EDIT
it reads:
BusyBox v1.15.3 (Ubuntu 1:1.15.3 - 1ubuntu5) built-in shell (ash)
Enter 'help' for a list of built in commands
(initramfs) mount:mounting /dev/loop0 on //filesystem.squashfs failed: Input/Output error
Can not mount /dev/loop0 (/cdrom/casper/filesystem.squashfs) on //filesystem.squashfs
Title: Re: Advice on setting up
Post by: Mark Greaves (PCNetSpec) on March 23, 2011, 07:44:31 pm
Can you first check the CD burned properly, or that your CD drive isn't having problems reading the disk

Boot from your 10.10 LiveCD, and as soon as you see:

(http://linuxforums.org.uk/MGalleryItem.php?id=1122)

displayed in the top left of your screen... keep hitting the Space Bar until...

A screen similar to this will appear and ask you to select a language... select English and hit Enter:
(if you get to the purple Ubuntu screen with the 5 or 6 dots, you missed it and will have to try again)
(http://linuxforums.org.uk/MGalleryItem.php?id=1132)

Then use the arrow keys to move to "Check disc for defects" and hit enter.
Title: Re: Advice on setting up
Post by: Mark Greaves (PCNetSpec) on March 23, 2011, 08:00:21 pm
(initramfs) mount:mounting /dev/loop0 on //filesystem.squashfs failed: Input/Output error
Can not mount /dev/loop0 (/cdrom/casper/filesystem.squashfs) on //filesystem.squashfs

The Input/Output error tells me it's highly likely to be a bad burn of the CDROM, first try checking it for defects as described above, then if any problems are found try re-burning it at a lower speed.

Some people seem to have more luck burning the ISO image onto a DVD rather than a CD
Title: Re: Advice on setting up
Post by: GG on March 23, 2011, 08:03:58 pm
yep, when I checked for defects it when to the 'can not mount' screen but until then it was fine so I'm guessing it's a bad burn.
I will try with DVD.
EDIT
Should I tick the 'underrun protection', 'pad data tracks' etc. boxes in InfraRecorder?
Title: Re: Advice on setting up
Post by: Mark Greaves (PCNetSpec) on March 23, 2011, 08:11:35 pm
Let me know, because there is also a small chance the download got corrupted somewhere along the line, so you will want to check the MD5 checksum of the ISO image you downloaded and make sure it matched the one on the Ubuntu site.

Give me a shout if need instructions.
Title: Re: Advice on setting up
Post by: GG on March 23, 2011, 08:46:24 pm
The md5sum on the DVD (which is also failing) is:

8606bee30b5fc55cb9c9a8f997607552  ./casper/initrd.lz
3e98978b3ca88f55dbc92fedbdd186ab  ./casper/filesystem.manifest
64dd1323213448e9e3e42e3b639d5fa3  ./casper/filesystem.manifest-desktop
49c84ad768c39cdf140061a61a428079  ./casper/filesystem.squashfs
50065155d2b4c37740b0e123cbfebc43  ./casper/vmlinuz
a13b7e99c829f41ddb89fcf20780fb1d  ./casper/filesystem.size
4f06aa578751899c1c43dde93164b0ce  ./dists/maverick/Release
5a9313d8543fea359656a1b08b411461  ./dists/maverick/restricted/binary-i386/Packages.gz
2f88764d78ab5a3101c5ed72f7f79d6c  ./dists/maverick/restricted/binary-i386/Release
dd7fd3b7cd349117f720654019f14922  ./dists/maverick/Release.gpg
81297d08599b2b2276dcf94f8c9543e3  ./dists/maverick/main/binary-i386/Packages.gz
b073e6f461e2d54143f70b3d40f57636  ./dists/maverick/main/binary-i386/Release
461cbc7ff94fdea8008cab34b611abb8  ./pics/blue-upperright.png
cd8aa5e7fa11b1362ef1869ac6b1aa56  ./pics/blue-lowerleft.png
a025c46d5daf227adfda51d81eb90f25  ./pics/blue-upperleft.png
92091902d3ca753bb858d4682b3fc26b  ./pics/logo-50.jpg
3c129ee10f707bd9dec10209d28840eb  ./pics/red-upperright.png
cde56251d6cae5214227d887dee3bab7  ./pics/red-upperleft.png
20d4bdecfa6d980d663fb5b93d37a842  ./pics/red-lowerright.png
0730e775a72519aaa450a3774fca5f55  ./pics/red-lowerleft.png
16ff51c168405e575d32bae001f280e4  ./pics/debian.jpg
9e18ae797773b2677b1b7b86e2aff28d  ./pics/blue-lowerright.png
c1a1595f9949c3d2d5fb22a525c26d7c  ./.disk/casper-uuid-generic
0d1f47b5bc3e4d762bc59581a766eeaf  ./.disk/release_notes_url
728cb968a88534e0c50a9d99621f13eb  ./.disk/cd_type
d41d8cd98f00b204e9800998ecf8427e  ./.disk/base_installable
7fd5ba45aa3d361369e7c15914c73bc2  ./.disk/info
62bf7841341b7faa69062fd0095af116  ./autorun.inf
8d6a2a045d7c0f48fe2e088f3f87b6ce  ./install/README.sbm
5a93a111efeb5305075c5e077715b6cd  ./install/sbm.bin
597df07bd94c2844aade36c28a7d421f  ./install/mt86plus
fe6fa04c981a9d3835f12f27bd6dda71  ./usb-creator.exe
24ec176894c781355f9ccb08ba69919e  ./preseed/ubuntu.seed
0391854d1af5a015a667f29fa0442e78  ./preseed/ltsp.seed
7e3aa6d1958baf72d369392fdb175486  ./preseed/cli.seed
6b711ba074b35f57ff4cb4c453109709  ./pool/restricted/b/bcmwl/bcmwl-kernel-source_5.60.48.36+bdcom-0ubuntu5_i386.deb
d21ce544f70c9c7d6a3af452d3e4b7c3  ./pool/restricted/s/sl-modem/sl-modem-daemon_2.9.11~20100718-2_i386.deb
e8db25137962d97309baf051a7e66f7b  ./pool/main/n/ndisgtk/ndisgtk_0.8.5-1_i386.deb
1cb737e6d019f35cc5e4664e5b5db265  ./pool/main/n/ndiswrapper/ndiswrapper-utils-1.9_1.56-3_i386.deb
74524f0ecc162d0f89f999ef832c99aa  ./pool/main/n/ndiswrapper/ndiswrapper-common_1.56-3_all.deb
561b1be68e99e1c7c9e6664fb6e87e81  ./pool/main/liba/libalgorithm-merge-perl/libalgorithm-merge-perl_0.08-1_all.deb
5cf3364130a9e9b11d71deadb0354648  ./pool/main/liba/libalgorithm-diff-perl/libalgorithm-diff-perl_1.19.02-1_all.deb
96e9bf35608b3380ca8dc6920255de3b  ./pool/main/b/build-essential/build-essential_11.5_i386.deb
a3279e18d400c54047b49853462d02b4  ./pool/main/b/b43-fwcutter/b43-fwcutter_013-2_i386.deb
3b4bb5a8f62636fd45480eecbe0520ea  ./pool/main/d/dpkg/dpkg-dev_1.15.8.4ubuntu3_all.deb
0708808b66daffa5520d270d76151417  ./pool/main/d/dpkg/libdpkg-perl_1.15.8.4ubuntu3_all.deb
bd0c1ef87e2466d74ea6ac42755ea29e  ./pool/main/d/dkms/dkms_2.1.1.2-3ubuntu1_all.deb
67259128a0d7c83e7c7b56e270a0741e  ./pool/main/g/gcc-4.4/libstdc++6-4.4-dev_4.4.4-14ubuntu5_i386.deb
09411ea75687bac8174dc18c65570547  ./pool/main/g/gcc-4.4/g++-4.4_4.4.4-14ubuntu5_i386.deb
4e3190bd7e336e9640cc643118e43a2b  ./pool/main/g/gcc-defaults/g++_4.4.4-1ubuntu2_i386.deb
308563b2eb5f6a64ead0a3b81afa4c66  ./pool/main/u/ubiquity/oem-config_2.4.8_all.deb
4a868215dc22264a78983d70fb9f73d6  ./pool/main/u/ubiquity/oem-config-gtk_2.4.8_all.deb
f8b821c5b94f3f06c779124959a47db2  ./pool/main/m/mouseemu/mouseemu_0.16-0ubuntu7_i386.deb
1b8a459712dd9a5a9b3aecd16a8219ab  ./pool/main/w/wvstreams/libwvstreams4.6-extras_4.6.1-1ubuntu1_i386.deb
a3507aa839e3a0a2d1bc4e01109b3f62  ./pool/main/w/wvstreams/libuniconf4.6_4.6.1-1ubuntu1_i386.deb
f5c6ff1c251dff34531fa4a9c91da08a  ./pool/main/w/wvstreams/libwvstreams4.6-base_4.6.1-1ubuntu1_i386.deb
756a6e5677184e1276094dd9cb0af9db  ./pool/main/w/wvdial/wvdial_1.60.4_i386.deb
4d4d776758c9d1535b486000ff673eff  ./pool/main/f/fakeroot/fakeroot_1.14.4-1ubuntu1_i386.deb
80ca9c983f402d6dddb02c4d7c1b27c4  ./pool/main/p/patch/patch_2.6-2ubuntu1_i386.deb
90728e63cba4cbc65d0d653ab400d164  ./pool/main/l/linux-wlan-ng/linux-wlan-ng_0.2.9+dfsg-4_i386.deb
3aafaec3951819c3e353e6fd635bc289  ./pool/main/l/linux-wlan-ng/linux-wlan-ng-doc_0.2.9+dfsg-4_all.deb
67169557c4c6fe5ea454057af102a8e4  ./pool/main/l/lupin/lupin-support_0.32_all.deb
cb3d5b5de9f45e5a107131c7230679f9  ./pool/main/s/setserial/setserial_2.17-45.2ubuntu2_i386.deb
bf8d2e9369530a8a22a92fa6ee59f9ce  ./boot/grub/loopback.cfg
d1db1f93bb7486593b7d1ea023c0e3f8  ./wubi.exe
481889d4a0b3b43b83636a4a7a28dab0  ./README.diskdefines

I don't know how to get its counterpart on ubuntu...
Title: Re: Advice on setting up
Post by: Mark Greaves (PCNetSpec) on March 23, 2011, 09:32:22 pm
No just do an MD5 of the ISO image you downloaded from Ubuntu (not the burned disk)... depending on which you got, it should match one of these:

a8d8e24bf8b82b4302d074fcac380d65 *ubuntu-10.10-alternate-amd64.iso
419ad8ee1bb76a49490f4a08b5be43f0 *ubuntu-10.10-alternate-i386.iso
1b9df87e588451d2ca4643a036020410 *ubuntu-10.10-desktop-amd64.iso
59d15a16ce90c8ee97fa7c211b7673a8 *ubuntu-10.10-desktop-i386.iso
6877bf8d673b87ba9500b0ff879091d0 *ubuntu-10.10-netbook-i386.iso
ab66a1d59a8d78e9ea8ef9b021d6574a *ubuntu-10.10-server-amd64.iso
ce1cee108de737d7492e37069eed538e *ubuntu-10.10-server-i386.iso

Probably the bold one if you got 10.10 desktop 32bit

[EDIT]
To generate an MD5 checksum in Windows, you'll need a 3rd party application such as:
http://www.fastsum.com/press/windows-md5-checksum-utility.php (http://www.fastsum.com/press/windows-md5-checksum-utility.php)
(BTW, you might want to check this for viruses... I haven't)

[EDIT2]
You might also try downloading the ISO from a different mirror, such as:
http://www.mirrorservice.org/sites/releases.ubuntu.com/10.10/ (http://www.mirrorservice.org/sites/releases.ubuntu.com/10.10/)
or
ftp://mirror.bytemark.co.uk/ubuntu-releases/10.10 (http://ftp://mirror.bytemark.co.uk/ubuntu-releases/10.10)
etc.

Both of those are fast UK mirrors, see here for a full list:
https://launchpad.net/ubuntu/+cdmirrors (https://launchpad.net/ubuntu/+cdmirrors)
Title: Re: Advice on setting up
Post by: GG on March 23, 2011, 10:06:26 pm
Then we have found the problem, I get EADFF14CF18A1D2A7014A54E76C6A677 (by the way, the application was clean).
Should I redownload?
Title: Re: Advice on setting up
Post by: Mark Greaves (PCNetSpec) on March 23, 2011, 10:07:00 pm
Yes :)

See edit 2 above

You want the:

ubuntu-10.10-desktop-i386.iso

Direct link here:
http://www.mirrorservice.org/sites/releases.ubuntu.com/10.10/ubuntu-10.10-desktop-i386.iso (http://www.mirrorservice.org/sites/releases.ubuntu.com/10.10/ubuntu-10.10-desktop-i386.iso)

and it's MD5 checksum should be:

59d15a16ce90c8ee97fa7c211b7673a8
Title: Re: Advice on setting up
Post by: GG on March 23, 2011, 10:47:45 pm
this is looking much more promising as it's the right size - facepalm moment when I noticed that my previous iso file was a tenth the size it should be  :o
Title: Re: Advice on setting up
Post by: Mark Greaves (PCNetSpec) on March 23, 2011, 11:16:55 pm
heh... we've all done it... I know I have, and spent a day wondering what was wrong ;)

Figured I was lucky and just got a good connection.
Title: Re: Advice on setting up
Post by: GG on March 24, 2011, 04:22:37 pm
...now very confused... it's 693 mb and it's still got the wrong checksum:
EADFF14CF18A1D2A7014A54E76C6A677 *ubuntu-10.10-desktop-i386.iso

Should I go ahead and burn it anyway?
Title: Re: Advice on setting up
Post by: Mark Greaves (PCNetSpec) on March 24, 2011, 05:24:46 pm
You can certainly try... it's not going to hurt anything when run in LiveCD mode, but I wouldn't install from it till I've tested it... where did you get the ISO from... gimme a link and I'll download it too and check the MD5, there is a chance, they've changed the ISO and haven't updated the MD5 checksums, but I doubt it.

Or try a different MD5 checksum application in Windows just in case it's the software:
http://www.md5summer.org/ (http://www.md5summer.org/)

693 MB sounds about right... I get (in Linux) -
693.2 MB (726827008 bytes)
but that's no positive indication that the ISO isn't corrupt.
Title: Re: Advice on setting up
Post by: GG on March 24, 2011, 05:56:14 pm
I got it from the mirrorservice.org direct link. Perhaps they've changed the md5sum, perhaps my checksum software is bad, but I'll try running from CD
Title: Re: Advice on setting up
Post by: GG on March 24, 2011, 06:44:49 pm
Now posting from Ubuntu   8)
I agree, I should check to ensure the Live CD is exactly right before I install - what sort of tests should I carry out, or is the fact that it's booting and seems to be testing enough?
Title: Re: Advice on setting up
Post by: Mark Greaves (PCNetSpec) on March 24, 2011, 06:55:28 pm
Just run a "Check media for defects", as explained above... I'm guessing the MD5 checksum software went mad on you, as the generated checksum was EXACTLY the same as your "under sized" original download... which is impossible.

or try the other MD5 software I listed:
http://www.md5summer.org/ (http://www.md5summer.org/)
and see what that comes up with.
Title: Re: Advice on setting up
Post by: GG on March 24, 2011, 10:36:00 pm
the new md5sum software works a treat, my iso is correct afterall and I cross my fingers and go to install it...
No doubt I'll soon be back with another problem; this is never ending.
Title: Re: Advice on setting up
Post by: Mark Greaves (PCNetSpec) on March 24, 2011, 10:42:13 pm
:) .. see you then, then... good luck.
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