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Messages - Mark Greaves (PCNetSpec)

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1
General Help & Advice / Re: 2nd Hard drive
« on: Yesterday at 01:08:24 pm »
Yep you can clone from one drive to another (as long as the recipient drive is the same size or larger).

2
General Help & Advice / Re: 2nd Hard drive
« on: Yesterday at 12:30:19 am »
I would, if one becomes corrupt it doesn't (necessarily) take the other with it.

3
General Discussion / Re: Scan image Problem
« on: April 20, 2019, 11:21:46 pm »
Which distro/version/architecture (eg. Ubuntu 18.04 64bit)

And which application are you using to scan ?

4
Glad I could help :)

5
General Discussion / Re: run fsck manually
« on: April 18, 2019, 05:13:54 pm »
Boot to a LiveUSB/LiveCD and run fsck from there.

You shouldn't run fsck on a mounted file system anyway.

6
General Help & Advice / Re: LIBRE OFFICE why no upgrade
« on: April 18, 2019, 05:12:39 pm »
Run:
Code: [Select]
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:libreoffice/ppa
then
Code: [Select]
sudo apt-get update
then
Code: [Select]
sudo apt-get upgrade
you should then be on LO 6.2.2

7
General Help & Advice / Re: Sticky Notes not working after upgrade
« on: April 13, 2019, 10:52:04 am »
Handy to know .. thanks :)

8
General Help & Advice / Re: PC Self-build v Custom Build
« on: April 12, 2019, 04:04:00 pm »
I'll see what I can find about those options tomorrow Rich .. busy day today I'm afraid :)

9
General Help & Advice / Re: Sticky Notes not working after upgrade
« on: April 12, 2019, 04:01:06 pm »
Knotes works on his Mint 18 .. but the notes aren't auto opened on login, he has to manually open them.

10
General Help & Advice / Re: Sticky Notes not working after upgrade
« on: April 10, 2019, 02:58:00 pm »
Let me know how you get on.

It works for me in Peppermint 9, so I'd assume it'll work in Mint .. but it is an assumption ;)

11
General Help & Advice / Re: PC Self-build v Custom Build
« on: April 10, 2019, 12:40:40 pm »
The only things in that you'd really need to check would be the motherboard, and the graphics driver support for the coffeelake CPU

https://www.reddit.com/r/buildapc/comments/8jumj5/cant_boot_off_of_a_usb_on_a_gigabyte_h310m_ds2/
suggests the motherboard will be fine .. with the right settings to allow booting from a USB stick for installation.

And phoronix suggest coffeelake support is now available in the 4.15 kernel onwards .. so basically anything based on Ubuntu 18.04 onwards.

Earlier versions of Ubuntu could be made to work with the
Code: [Select]
i915.alpha_support=1
kernel boot parameter, but it should no longer be necessary in 18.04
https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=article&item=core-i3-8100&num=1

Yes, for normal desktop use (no gaming) you could probably get a slightly cheaper CPU .. but personally I wouldn't build anything less than an i3 nowadays, if only for future proofing .. and by all accounts, that i3 performs pretty well (faster than a Skylake i5 according to Phoronix) so I'd say a pretty good choice.

12
Try:
Code: [Select]
sudo apt-get remove --purge minecraft-installer

13
General Help & Advice / Re: Sticky Notes not working after upgrade
« on: April 09, 2019, 01:53:14 pm »
Instead of knotes (which I gather relies on the 'restore session' function of KDE) in Cinnamon, maybe instead try indicator-stickynotes.

You can get it for Mint 18 (which is based on Ubuntu 16.04) by direct downloading this file:-
https://launchpad.net/~umang/+archive/ubuntu/indicator-stickynotes/+files/indicator-stickynotes_1.0.0-0~ppa1_all.deb
and double clicking it to install.

Info on it can be found here
https://www.maketecheasier.com/stick-notes-app-ubuntu/
but probably not best to install it with their method as I'm not sure how adding Ubuntu PPA's works in Mint



To UNINSTALL:-
Code: [Select]
sudo apt-get remove --purge indicator-stickynotes

14
General Help & Advice / Re: Mint 19.1 install issues
« on: April 08, 2019, 12:03:20 pm »
Personally I'd go for 2 x 4GB to take advantage of the wider/faster bandwidth of dual-channel memory.
https://uk.crucial.com/gbr/en/what-is-dual-channel-memory

I can't really comment on the memory you currently have because I don't know it's speed (we could easily find this out)  .. nor do we know the speed/type of RAM the new motherboard can accept yet.

But chances are if these stick work with a Pentium 4, they're unlikely to be compatible with a modern system .. they're most likely DDR which (I'm 99.9% sure) use a different socket type to DDR4 as well as different bus frequencies.

15
General Help & Advice / Re: Mint 19.1 install issues
« on: April 07, 2019, 02:52:46 pm »
Yep, get an SSD, even if it's just 128GB, though they've come down in price considerably lately and a 240GB model can now be found for around £30 or a 480GB for £45

The bigger the better where SSD's are concerned, the more free space on the drive the longer it will last .. simply because of the way wear levelling works.

Processor, and more specifically which is better AMD or Intel - Historically I've been a fan of AMD, but experience is showing me at least at the low to mid end processors Intel seem (to me) to have the edge in Linux, now this may not specifically be to do with the processor as much as the chipsets that come on the respective motherboards. For example I had a couple of laptops with quad core AMD A8 CPU's, now on paper they were supposed to be roughly equivalent to an i5 from around the same date, but in the real world appeared to be being held back by the AMD AHCI chipset/driver to where an i3 laptop I had was faster.

That said, that was a few years ago now so things may have changed but I'm still worried that though the low/mid end Ryzens seem very good on Paper they may again be let down by supporting hardware.

There's also the fact that people have had some rough experiences with SOME of the Ryzen processors not yet being well supported in Linux .. so if you're thinking AMD, do your homework.

It'd probably be better if you posted a couple of specific component lists here, and then let people research those components for known issues.

Oh, and these days I'd likely be looking at 8GB RAM .. you can easily get away with 4, but 8 isn't that much more and will future proof the system .. it'll also mean you're much less likely to ever start paging out to swap, which will lengthen the life of the SSD.

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