Author Topic: Booting Linux mint  (Read 2559 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Trenchcoat

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 15
  • Karma: 0
  • I've just joined!
    • View Profile
    • Awards
Booting Linux mint
« on: August 23, 2021, 07:40:45 pm »
My Toshiba Equium l300-140 which ran Windows Vista home premium has no option in BIOS 1.50 to boot a cd/dvd which I have bought to install Linux mint cinnamon 34 bit. The cd dvd optical drive appears to be built in Toshiba only with no option to boot from my own disc or usb. Can I make this machine bootable from a dvd?

Offline Rich J

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 588
  • Karma: 9
  • Gender: Male
  • Still a Linux Luvvie!
    • View Profile
    • Awards
Re: Booting Linux mint
« Reply #1 on: August 24, 2021, 08:58:15 am »
My Toshiba Equium l300-140 which ran Windows Vista home premium has no option in BIOS 1.50 to boot a cd/dvd which I have bought to install Linux mint cinnamon 34 bit. The cd dvd optical drive appears to be built in Toshiba only with no option to boot from my own disc or usb. Can I make this machine bootable from a dvd?

Firstly, can you access the BIOS on start-up?  Toshiba's have various methods, depending on model - you may have to press F2, F8 or F12 to access the menu. Once that opens, there should be a menu available to allow you to boot from a disk.  Try Googling "Toshiba Equium l300-140 bios menu" and try out the various methods listed.

Just for info:  Mint Cinnamon is is quite a 'heavyweight' in the Mint family of distros and your laptop may struggle a bit, depending on the RAM installed.  Also, 32bit is now being gradually phased out in favour of 64bit software - worth checking to see if yours is 64bit capable.  If it is 32bit only, there are other, lighter, versions of Mint (or alternatives to) that will do the job just as well without the 'bells and whistles' of Cinnamon - it depends on your own requirements as to usage.

Hope this helps,

Rich



The Linux Community Forum

Re: Booting Linux mint
« Reply #1 on: August 24, 2021, 08:58:15 am »

Offline Keith

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1523
  • Karma: 20
  • Gender: Male
  • Linux Novice
    • View Profile
    • Awards
Re: Booting Linux mint
« Reply #2 on: August 24, 2021, 03:25:50 pm »
Hi Trenchcoat.

If your machine is 32-bit then you might find this link for Mint MATE useful: https://forums.linuxmint.com/viewtopic.php?t=261881.  The article is aimed at the Asus Eee Pc X101ch, but it could be relevant to your situation. 

Keith

Offline Trenchcoat

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 15
  • Karma: 0
  • I've just joined!
    • View Profile
    • Awards
Re: Booting Linux mint
« Reply #3 on: August 24, 2021, 03:46:02 pm »
I can get into BIOS via f2 but then in Boot section there is only 1 Lan 2 fdd 3 USB memory 4 cddvd toshiba sd l622a 5 hdd. Could I use USB memory and download onto my stick a smaller version of Linux than Mint? Would this install after booting fromUSB memory?
« Last Edit: August 24, 2021, 04:03:12 pm by Trenchcoat »

Offline DavidMcCann

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 79
  • Karma: 5
  • I've just joined!
    • View Profile
    • Awards
Re: Booting Linux mint
« Reply #4 on: August 24, 2021, 04:06:56 pm »
I couldn't trace the L300-140 — did you mean the L300-146? The L300 is definitely a 64-bit computer, so there's not much point in using a 32-bit distro. That version of Mint will be supported until 2023, but after that it's all over — no more 32-bit Mint. As Keith said, the Cinnamon desktop may be a bit too much for that machine. Xfce would be the best choice.

It may be a silly question, but is your disk bootable? Look at it using Windows and see that it actually has a lot of folders and files. If it just has one file, ending .iso, then you didn't burn it correctly. If the disk is bootable, what actually happens when you choose BIOS option 4, cd/dvd?

The Linux Community Forum

Re: Booting Linux mint
« Reply #4 on: August 24, 2021, 04:06:56 pm »

Offline Trenchcoat

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 15
  • Karma: 0
  • I've just joined!
    • View Profile
    • Awards
Re: Booting Linux mint
« Reply #5 on: August 26, 2021, 06:45:54 pm »
Yes, it is 146. My mistake. Total memory 1024MB.
It ran Vista Home Premium.
My plan is to download the most appropriate Linux programme onto a 64bit memory stick along with Rufus to make it bootable then try to install that in the USB MEMORY option (which appears to me to be the only one of the five options for booting from an external source currently on the machine?)
A couple of things occur to me:
1, On machines with Windows already installed do you have to completely de-install Windows to make room for Linux and if so how do you do that? Would having two take up double the space? I actually thought that as part of the installation process you were given the option to delete or de-install Windows?
2, The point you make about 34 bit Cinnamon being time limited quite surprises me. I am motivated to switch from Windows because it is too time limited and persistently requires updates which I have no control over and which I am certain is harvesting data for third parties. You seem to be saying that Cinnamon is time limited too?
3, Which version of Linux would be most functional and easiest to install on the Equium l300 - 146 and which would you recommend for me?

Offline Rich J

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 588
  • Karma: 9
  • Gender: Male
  • Still a Linux Luvvie!
    • View Profile
    • Awards
Re: Booting Linux mint
« Reply #6 on: August 26, 2021, 08:25:51 pm »
Yes, it is 146. My mistake. Total memory 1024MB.
It ran Vista Home Premium.  Then it should run 'most' Linux distros ok, albeit the 'heavier' ones may run a little slower (but all will be faster than Vista ever was!)  The governing factor is RAM - the more you have, the faster it runs
My plan is to download the most appropriate Linux programme onto a 64bit memory stick along with Rufus to make it bootable then try to install that in the USB MEMORY option (which appears to me to be the only one of the five options for booting from an external source currently on the machine?) Yes, that's another way to do it but if it will, then the option to install from disk most certainly will be in the menu somewhere, if a DVD player is installed, that is.
A couple of things occur to me:
1, On machines with Windows already installed do you have to completely de-install Windows to make room for Linux and if so how do you do that? No, you can run both alongside each other - it's called 'dual-booting - the Linux installer will automatically allocate the space required.   However........ Windows is notoriously 'bloated' and when installed will take over the whole drive so Linux will 'shrink' the partition that Windows sits on to make room for itself.
Would having two take up double the space?  No, see above. For info - Linux generally has a much smaller footprint than Windows I actually thought that as part of the installation process you were given the option to delete or de-install Windows?  Yes, you do have that option
2, The point you make about 34 bit Cinnamon being time limited quite surprises me. I am motivated to switch from Windows because it is too time limited and persistently requires updates which I have no control over and which I am certain is harvesting data for third parties. You seem to be saying that Cinnamon is time limited too?  No, you misunderstand.  It is 32bit (not 34...) software that is being phased out.  All computers are now 64bit capable and have been for several years. 32bit software will still run on 64bit machines but there will no longer be any development or updating of it.  Simply put, it is now redundant so no point in working on it further.  Also, Linux has regular updates but these are more of refinement and further bolstering an already very secure system.
3, Which version of Linux would be most functional and easiest to install on the Equium l300 - 146 and which would you recommend for me?  Most Linux installs are pretty straightforward these days and it depends on your requirements and what your machine capability is as to version. Even the lightest and most basic of distros have good functionality and a great advantage of Linux is there's a mass of free software available that you can add if you wish.  ;) 


Offline Trenchcoat

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 15
  • Karma: 0
  • I've just joined!
    • View Profile
    • Awards
Re: Booting Linux mint
« Reply #7 on: August 27, 2021, 12:04:38 pm »
Many thanks,
I made the mistake of buying a Mint Cinnamon 32 bit CD on EBay thinking that I could install it on a Satellite M70-343.
I got quite excited because I saw this lovely desktop on it after what seemed like hours and thought RESULT!
I learnt in this process that user name is mint and password is just enter.
I also learnt that it is too big to install on that machine. The guy said he would send me a CD suitable for it gratis.
Now the Equium BIOS for CD booting is locked to a specific Toshiba Cd/DVD which is numbered and may be integral or built-in. It does not appear to recognise other CDs.
My concern is that MSM are now controlling the hardware and will fight back.
I really now see them as pervasive, insidious and cynically led, like the REAL virus we need to be vaccinated against.
I had no choice about upgrading to H20 on my main computer and they store all my user names and passwords.

Offline steve57

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 19
  • Karma: 2
  • I've just joined!
    • View Profile
    • Awards
Re: Booting Linux mint
« Reply #8 on: August 28, 2021, 11:57:00 am »
I also learnt that it is too big to install on that machine.

Sorry but I don't understand that, how can it be too big? Or are you trying to install along side everything else that's already on the machine and there isn't enough room left? If so I'm afraid you're going to have the same problem with most distros.

As for which distro to go for, looks like you need something that's both lightweight and suitable for beginners. From my own experience (as a beginner myself) I would suggest Zorin Lite. Of all the distros I've tried (and I've tried an awful lot) I found Zorin Lite to be the quickest to boot up, and most responsive in use on a relatively under powered machine.

You could also try MX Linux, which is what I use most of the time now. Not as light as Zorin but lighter than Mint (in my opinion). I was previously using Mint and was perfectly happy with it, until a couple of months ago when I decided to install the latest version (Mint 20.2 I think). First thing was that it seemed to take twice as long to boot up, then over next week or two I had one or two other problems that I'd never had before. It was at this point I decided to look for an alternative, and settled on MX. Perfectly happy with it so far.

What you have to remember is that just because a particular distro runs perfectly well straight "out of the box" on my machine, it doesn't always follow that it will do the same on yours. It would be impossible to create a distro that suits every bit of hardware ever made, so often a bit of trial and error is needed. I'm fortunate in that I have three machines available that I can use to experiment with and try different things, and on more than one occasion I've had a distro that's worked perfectly on one, but been a right headache on another.

Good luck with whatever you decide to do, and please keep us posted with your progress.

The Linux Community Forum

Re: Booting Linux mint
« Reply #8 on: August 28, 2021, 11:57:00 am »

Offline Trenchcoat

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 15
  • Karma: 0
  • I've just joined!
    • View Profile
    • Awards
Re: Booting Linux mint
« Reply #9 on: September 08, 2021, 09:35:51 am »
Thank you.
"Distro" is the word for the bootable CD/DVD you can either buy or make yourself on a bootable CD/DVD?
Why are mobile phones now so much faster, smaller, more reliable and powerful than mainstream computers? Surely tablets and phones will completely replace everything?
Is it the case that on Windows 10 H20 you cannot boot by pressing any of the F buttons?
An MSM account is, of course, mandatory on our mobile phones along with Google accounts, enabling them to send timelines of all your movements, among other astonishingly invasive things.
It feels pervasive, addictive and totally habit forming.
It also feels completely impossible to avoid, evade or replace.
 :'( :'( :'(

Offline Trenchcoat

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 15
  • Karma: 0
  • I've just joined!
    • View Profile
    • Awards
Re: Booting Linux mint
« Reply #10 on: September 08, 2021, 01:08:43 pm »
I downloaded Zorin Lite os 15 64 bit on my main computer then put it on a usb stick which I then put into my Equium l300 - 146. I changed boot to USB memory Generic and now I get "Missing operatv4.5system". This doesn't feel complicated, it feels impossible
 :'(

Offline Keith

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1523
  • Karma: 20
  • Gender: Male
  • Linux Novice
    • View Profile
    • Awards
Re: Booting Linux mint
« Reply #11 on: September 08, 2021, 01:35:29 pm »
Trenchcoat,

If you simply copied the downloaded Zorin file to your USB stick then this won't work.  The downloaded file is an ISO file - a collection of very many files compressed into a single file.  This needs to be expanded and organised into an "image" on a Live USB or Live DVD that can be used to try or install the OS onto your HDD.
Many DVD-writers have a facility for burning image files to DVD (eg Brasero) or to USB (Etcher-electron or Unetbootin).  Etcher is good as it comes with a USB formatter as well. 

Keith

Offline Trenchcoat

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 15
  • Karma: 0
  • I've just joined!
    • View Profile
    • Awards
Re: Booting Linux mint
« Reply #12 on: September 10, 2021, 03:34:45 pm »
Thank you Keith,
I used Unetbootin and am now copying files into the Equium and it appears that 64-bit Mint Cinammon 19 is on there.
What I notice is that the time is always one hour ahead.
I chose to put it in place of anything else in the hard drive. Effectively delete everything else.
Does this mean that I now need to boot from something other than USB and can use that USB stick as a portable device to override any other software on any other computer?

Offline Keith

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1523
  • Karma: 20
  • Gender: Male
  • Linux Novice
    • View Profile
    • Awards
Re: Booting Linux mint
« Reply #13 on: September 10, 2021, 03:45:55 pm »
Don't worry about the time difference:  you can always change that under "Settings". 

Now that you have installed Mint, ensure that the USB stick is removed before booting.  Your machine will try to boot from the first device listed in the "Boot Order" you have set but as the USB stick is absent will try the next device in the boot list (often the DVD) and failing that it will try your HDD where, indeed, you have put the operating system.  In other words, just boot without a Live USB or Live DVD inserted and all will be fine.

If you ever want to try another OS, then booting with an appropriate Live USB or Live DVD inserted will display that OS (as long as you click on "Try without installing"!). 

Quote
.... can use that USB stick as a portable device to override any other software on any other computer?
Yes;  your Live USB can be used to install Mint on any other computer.

Do let us know how you get on with your new Mint.

Keith
« Last Edit: September 10, 2021, 05:52:06 pm by Keith »

Offline Rich J

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 588
  • Karma: 9
  • Gender: Male
  • Still a Linux Luvvie!
    • View Profile
    • Awards
Re: Booting Linux mint
« Reply #14 on: September 11, 2021, 07:52:49 am »
Don't worry about the time difference:  you can always change that under "Settings". 

Now that you have installed Mint, ensure that the USB stick is removed before booting.  Your machine will try to boot from the first device listed in the "Boot Order" you have set but as the USB stick is absent will try the next device in the boot list (often the DVD) and failing that it will try your HDD where, indeed, you have put the operating system.  In other words, just boot without a Live USB or Live DVD inserted and all will be fine.

If you ever want to try another OS, then booting with an appropriate Live USB or Live DVD inserted will display that OS (as long as you click on "Try without installing"!). 

Quote
.... can use that USB stick as a portable device to override any other software on any other computer?
Yes;  your Live USB can be used to install Mint on any other computer.

Do let us know how you get on with your new Mint.

Keith

And the same Live USB can be used to diagnose and repair your OS should anything go wrong with it - a very useful function indeed.  ;)

 


SimplePortal 2.3.3 © 2008-2010, SimplePortal