Migrating from Windows to Linux

Hi all,
I am Jerry. New to Linux more like a virgin to this OS. Anyway, want to do as my message title and need advice as to which Linux OS is best for me to run for my prehistoric laptop ( AMD Duron Processor ) and Desktop ( Intel Quad Core )?
Also where can I purchase a CD to load up onto said machines?
Thanks.

Personally I’d suggest Peppermint for the older hardware, and maybe Mint for the newer.

There’s no need to purchase a CD/DVD … both are available for free in you have either a USB stick or a DVD to burn them to


In fact I’d suggest Peppermint for both … but then again I’m part of the dev team, so I guess I would wouldn’t I :wink:

[EDIT]

Nearly forgot … welcome to the forum :slight_smile:

I’ll try to type up a more detailed response later (when I’ve a bit of free time) explaining why I’d choose Peppermint/Mint … meanwhile if you have any other questions, please don’t hesitate to ask.

Hi Mark,
thanks for the message. Can i download it from here or is there another website to do so?

Have a gander at the official site.

And you can download Linux Mint Cinnamon from here :wink:

Hi Jerry - and welcome! As a relatively recent ‘migrant’ myself I can endorse the previous replies.

I use both Mint (main pc with 2GB memory) and Peppermint (wife’s netbook with 1GB) and both os’s work fine, are stable and will do everything we need from them. My main pc is now getting on for 10yrs old and Mint flies on it, the netbook is newer but lower powered and Peppermint is perfect for it. What I would say is, whatever you choose, go for a Long-term Support version (LTS) to be sure of getting the best out of Linux.

Be prepared to be more ‘hands on’ than Windows - in terms of installation, setting up and maintaining but be assured it is a lot easier than you might be otherwise advised! As long as you can follow instructions and copy/paste, it is as easy as that! Sure, there will be the odd glitch - but with Linux you can generally sort it pretty easily and you will have a system that is tailor-made to you, is VERY secure and will give excellent service.

Also, you’ve come to the right place with this site! Have a browse through the topics and see how the various issues are dealt with - speedily and correctly - and I’m sure all will be well!

For me, changing to Linux has been the best thing I’ve done in computing and has freed me from the mire I was in before! No more worries over viruses and the like and as long as you pay attention to how you operate it, Linux will pay you back in spades!

Good luck on your journey!

Rich

Hi Jerry
Welcome to the forum

where can I purchase a CD to load up onto said machines?

There’s no need to purchase any CD’s almost all Linux distributions are free to download and use, unlike Windows Linux distributions are free/open source software licensed under the GPL which means there are no licensing restrictions, no product keys, no EULAs & no validation

also most Linux distributions can be run directly from a CD/DVD or USB stick on your computer/Laptop allowing you to try it out (just like it was fully installed) without making any changes to your PC/Laptop, and most distributions make it very easy to install alongside an existing Windows installation as a dual boot configuration so you can keep Windows on your PC while you make up your mind if Linux is for you.

You can download Peppermint or Mint from the links Mark & SeZo posted or if you want a more complete list of available distros and where to download them go here http://distrowatch.com/

and finally if you run into any problems or just have any questions we’re here to help

Good luck

Graeme

Ooops, forgot my followup post :-[

Reasons I’d suggest Peppermint or Mint

Peppermint 6:-
a) it’s based on Ubuntu 14.04.2 so is a long term support release, and has access to all the software in the Ubuntu software repositories
b) it’s based on Ubuntu so 99.% of the plethora of available online tutorials/documentation/forum help/info will also apply to Peppermint.
c) it’s based on Ubuntu so has access to the PPA’s
d) it’s based on Ubuntu so third party drivers are readily available
e) it has a great support forum with friendly memebrs (if I do say so myself :slight_smile: )
f) it’s layout will feel very familiar to a new Windows convert
g) it’s light on resources so will run well on older hardware, or fly like the wind on newer hardware
h) it doesn’t make software choices for you, but gives you easy access to install just what YOU want
i) should you choose to use this feature (ice) it puts web apps on an equal footing with locally installed applications by easily integrating them into the system menu, and opening them in their own window.
j) I’m a member of the Peppermint dev team so I’d obviously recommend it :slight_smile:

Mint 17.2:-
a) it’s based on Ubuntu 14.04.2 so is a long term support release, and has access to all the software in the Ubuntu software repositories
b) it’s based on Ubuntu so 99.% of the plethora of available online tutorials/documentation/forum help/info will also apply to Peppermint.
c) it’s based on Ubuntu so has access to the PPA’s
d) it’s based on Ubuntu so third party drivers are readily available
e) it’s layout will feel very familiar to a new Windows convert
f) it’s heavier on resources than Peppermint but has some advanced features “out of the box” … nothing that can’t be done on Pepeprmint, but some things may have already been done for you or may be made simpler.
g) it installs a lot of software “out of the box”, but it may not be the software YOU would choose.

Well why not Ubuntu then I hear you ask … one word “Unity”

If you’re not sure what “Unity” is, it’s their new desktop environment which is IMHO as weird as Windows “metro” …
(in fact I should have added “doesn’t use Unity” to the Pepermint and Mint reasons for recommendation lists above)

http://i.imgur.com/gEIC30R.jpg

Mark,
When you say “Unity”, I remember Kenneth Williams running around saying ‘Infamy Infamy They’ve all got it Infamy’ :wink:
I know it was ‘Infamy’ but I just have this weird vision of you running round saying ‘Unity Unity They’ve all got it Unity’ ;D ;D :wink:

LOL … but luckily only Ubuntu have it :slight_smile:

I would agree completely with this - “unity” is, IMHO completely barking. I found it nearly impossible to use.

You could try https://ubuntugnome.org/ - a more traditional desktop environment

which I am running here on newish hardware. (on older hardware, i would be running peppermint)

Not sure I’d call Gnome 3 (shell) a more “traditional” desktop though :-\

Yeah, best stick with Mint Cinnamon or Peppermint

Sorry. :slight_smile: perhaps I should have said that it looks like a more traditional desktop environment.

(Tramadol fazing my brain)

That would be MATE/Cinnamon/Xfce/LXDE … but if anything Gnome 3 (shell) is more akin to Unity than a “traditional” desktop.

I’m not sure which I like/loathe the most between Unity and Gnome 3 (shell) … I tried to like them, but in the end I just couldn’t … not that everyone has to follow my personal tastes, but I just can’t in all honesty “recommend” them, particularly for someone fresh from Windows (unless maybe they’re fresh from Windows 8, and belonged to the group of ten that actually liked that :o )

Er, ok, but honestly,my desktop appearance hasn’t really changed since Ubuntu 10.04…{ I ignored 12.04 as it didn’t work here ) - can I upload a screenshot ? I think i remember reading something about not doing that anymore …?

You can upload an image to somewhere like
http://imgur.com
then post the URL here between IMG tags.

But it doesn’t change the fact that no matter what it “looks” like, it still has weird ways of displaying the application shortcuts and virtual desktops that is more tuned for touchscreen than mouse.

it also doesn’t change the fact that Ubuntu were happily going along with Gnome 3(shell) development when they had “design differences” so went off and did Unity in a VERY short time which probably explains the similarities (dock, applications in a huge popup screen, virtual desktops as popup/popout, etc.)

both broke away from the “traditional” desktop of taksbar/menu/desktop with icons on it, and ran off on some weird so called “task/activity” based metaphor, which really changed nothing and just added a new learning curve for no good reason.

How do the images here:
https://wiki.gnome.org/Projects/GnomeShell/Design
really differ from Unity ?

(bearing in mind that I am “drunk” on prescription analgesia ::))…

The images you linked to don’t look anything like my desktop, but then I am running classic view, so I have the task bar et al, as “normal”. ( so my first post wasn’t really accurate enough, sorry :-[)

I agree with everything you say about unity, and frankly, anything that looks like it, I will cheerfully put it/them room 101, so to speak. (<- for once, I am being polite )

Edited for spelling (!)

Oh yeah, that’s a redeeming feature of G3S, the fact that you can change the shell … but if I were to recommend Gnome 3 with a non-default shell, well we’re back to Mint Cinnamon :wink:

Hello Anyone/Everyone. Can I please join your forum. By way of explanation, I am buying a new PC and am going to run it with a Linux OS. I am thoroughly cheesed off with you know what. As a complete beginner with Linux I suspect I will need some (a lot) of help but not be able to contribute too much, as least early on. If it’s O/K I would like to post a spec for a new base unit to check it will be suitable.