Networking with Windows PC's

Dear All,

Have read about a program called putty is this the best option for getting my windows based PCs to see Linux?

It is listed in my Peppermint Linux as a package so should be easy to install.

Dose anyone know if it is easy to use and set up.

Thanks in advance.

Erm… NO, I’m guessing you were being told to install Putty to the Windows PC, and then SSH into the Linux box.

What do you mean by “getting my windows based PCs to see Linux” ?

Accessing shared folders on the Linux box from Windows ?

Hi, The Linux PC can see the windows based PCs on the network and also access the sheared folders, documents, mp3 files.

However, the Windows based PCs do not see the Linux machine and so can not share the sheared folders.

If the Putty package is part of the packages available on my Linux PC then I would expect it should be installed on Linux.

No mention of installing anything on the Windows PCs.

Regards.

Here is the Synaptic description for the putty package… it’s right there for anyone to see:

This is the Unix port of the popular Windows ssh client, PuTTY. It supports
flexible terminal setup, mid-session reconfiguration using Ctrl-rightclick,
multiple X11 authentication protocols, and various other interesting things
not provided by ssh in an xterm.

And the PuTTY homepage description:

PuTTY is an SSH and telnet client, developed originally by Simon Tatham for the Windows platform.

I could be wrong about this, but I’m pretty sure Windows doesn’t have an SSH server (at least built in), and in even if it does, PuTTY is NOT an SSH server, it is an SSH client.

PuTTY has historically been used to allow Windows clients to connect to Linux servers running openssh-server.

PuTTY is a CLIENT, which allows you to connect TO an SSH server, not an SSH sever that would allow incoming connections… so “at best” if installed on a Linux box, would allow it to connect TO a Windows box, only if the Windows box had an SSH server running… but you’ve already stated that the Linux box can ALREADY connect to the Windows box.

So they were DEFINITELY talking about running openssh-server on the Linux box, and using the PuTTY Windows client to connect to it.

Either way… for what you want, SSH is NOT what you you are after.

You need to be looking at installing samba and configuring your workgroup/domain in /etc/samba/smb.conf

The Windows PC’s probably cannot “see” the Linux box because you haven’t actually got anything shared and/or samba (if installed) is set to a different workgroup (AFAIK it’s set to WORKGROUP by default so make sure the Windows boxes are set to the same, or change it in smb.conf) …

I don’t know how LXDE do things, but in the full GNOME desktop, all you have to do is right-click any folder inside your “Home” folder, and select “Sharing options” and the system will offer to install samba, and configure shares on that folder for you.

Thanks for the information. Have installed SAMBA and sheared folders, changed WORKGROUP to that of my network. The Linux PC can now be seen by the Windows PCs (all well and good) when I try to access the Linux system it asks for a username and password.

I am typing in the username that I log in with and the system email (this is rejected) is there anyway to prevent the request for a password?

Regards.

The password should be the login and password of the account that owns the shared directory… or in the “Sharing Options”, select “Guest Access”.

I am still having problems with networking (why do PCs have so many issues).

The windows PCs can not see the Linux PC again. How do you configure SAMBA from a Terminal window?

When I click on my Samba link I get a warning message " some lines couldn’t be understood while reading the configuration file /etc/samba/smb.conf. These maybe unknown configuration directives for samba plugins but could also be configuration errors"

here is the read out -

38: workgroup = 000D0B6DA3C4

41: server string = %h server

52: dns proxy = no

78: log file = /var/log/samba/log.%m

81: max log size = 1000

90: syslog = 0

93: panic action = /usr/share/samba/panic-action %d

106: encrypt passwords = true

110: passdb backend = tdbsam

112: obey pam restrictions = yes

117: unix password sync = yes

122: passwd program = /usr/bin/passwd %u

123: passwd chat = Enter\snew\s\spassword:* %n\n Retype\snew\s\spassword:* %n\n password\supdated\ssuccessfully .

128: pam password change = yes

236: wins support = yes

238: comment = Home Directories

239: browseable = no

247: create mask = 0700

251: directory mask = 0700

258: valid users = %S

282: comment = All Printers

283: browseable = no

284: path = /var/spool/samba

285: printable = yes

286: guest ok = no

288: create mask = 0700

293: comment = Printer Drivers

294: path = /var/lib/samba/printers

295: browseable = yes

297: guest ok = no

331: path = /home/allusers

332: available = yes

333: browsable = yes

334: public = yes

338: path = /home/allusers/Music

339: available = yes

340: browsable = yes

341: public = yes

  1. Turn off wins support unless you are running a wins server. (line 236)

  2. Are you sure your Workgroup is 000D0B6DA3C4 on your Windows boxes ? … they normally default to WORKGROUP, or MSHOME.

  3. Go to Menu>Preferences>Users and Groups, If I were you I’d make sure my Account Type: was set to Administrator… but more importantly, click Manage groups, scroll down to sambashare and highlight it, then select Properties and make sure you are a member of that group (ie. box with your username is ticked).

If your username is ticked, you can use its login and password to connect to shares from the Windows boxes, and just tell Windows to remember the passwords.

You do realise you’ve set your shares read-only ?

Hi, thanks for tips. Work Group is as listed this is the workgroup name of my router all the Windows boxes have the same workgroup.

Did as you requested here is the new readout-

38: workgroup = 000D0B6DA3C4

41: server string = %h server

52: dns proxy = no

78: log file = /var/log/samba/log.%m

81: max log size = 1000

90: syslog = 0

93: panic action = /usr/share/samba/panic-action %d

106: encrypt passwords = true

110: passdb backend = tdbsam

112: obey pam restrictions = yes

117: unix password sync = yes

122: passwd program = /usr/bin/passwd %u

123: passwd chat = Enter\snew\s\spassword:* %n\n Retype\snew\s\spassword:* %n\n password\supdated\ssuccessfully .

128: pam password change = yes

236: wins support = no

238: comment = Home Directories

239: browseable = no

247: create mask = 0700

251: directory mask = 0700

258: valid users = %S

282: comment = All Printers

283: browseable = no

284: path = /var/spool/samba

285: printable = yes

286: guest ok = no

288: create mask = 0700

293: comment = Printer Drivers

294: path = /var/lib/samba/printers

295: browseable = yes

297: guest ok = no

331: path = /home/allusers

332: available = yes

333: browsable = yes

334: public = yes

338: path = /home/allusers/Music

339: available = yes

340: browsable = yes

341: public = yes

Well that looks OK to me, but if it isn’t, you’ll have to wait till next week… the Missus and kids have taken their Windows PC’s up north with them on holiday, so I can’t test anything Windows ↔ Linux related till then :wink:

Unless someone else responds with an answer… or spots something I’m missing :slight_smile:

OK will let you know if still having a problem after the Bank holiday weekend.

Thanks for your help.

OK, sorted it… I found an old laptop with XP, and installed peppermint to a USB stick…

You need to make a few changes to your /etc/samba/smb.conf

Here’s one that should work:
(click on the spoiler button to display the working smb.conf)

[spoiler]#

Sample configuration file for the Samba suite for Debian GNU/Linux.

This is the main Samba configuration file. You should read the

smb.conf(5) manual page in order to understand the options listed

here. Samba has a huge number of configurable options most of which

are not shown in this example

Some options that are often worth tuning have been included as

commented-out examples in this file.

- When such options are commented with “;”, the proposed setting

differs from the default Samba behaviour

- When commented with “#”, the proposed setting is the default

behaviour of Samba but the option is considered important

enough to be mentioned here

NOTE: Whenever you modify this file you should run the command

“testparm” to check that you have not made any basic syntactic

errors.

A well-established practice is to name the original file

“smb.conf.master” and create the “real” config file with

testparm -s smb.conf.master >smb.conf

This minimizes the size of the really used smb.conf file

which, according to the Samba Team, impacts performance

However, use this with caution if your smb.conf file contains nested

“include” statements. See Debian bug #483187 for a case

where using a master file is not a good idea.

#======================= Global Settings =======================

[global]

Browsing/Identification

Change this to the workgroup/NT-domain name your Samba server will part of

workgroup = 000D0B6DA3C4
netbios name = peppermint

server string is the equivalent of the NT Description field

server string = %h server

Windows Internet Name Serving Support Section:

WINS Support - Tells the NMBD component of Samba to enable its WINS Server

wins support = no

WINS Server - Tells the NMBD components of Samba to be a WINS Client

Note: Samba can be either a WINS Server, or a WINS Client, but NOT both

; wins server = w.x.y.z

This will prevent nmbd to search for NetBIOS names through DNS.

dns proxy = no

What naming service and in what order should we use to resolve host names

to IP addresses

; name resolve order = lmhosts host wins bcast

Networking

The specific set of interfaces / networks to bind to

This can be either the interface name or an IP address/netmask;

interface names are normally preferred

; interfaces = 127.0.0.0/8 eth0

Only bind to the named interfaces and/or networks; you must use the

‘interfaces’ option above to use this.

It is recommended that you enable this feature if your Samba machine is

not protected by a firewall or is a firewall itself. However, this

option cannot handle dynamic or non-broadcast interfaces correctly.

; bind interfaces only = yes

Debugging/Accounting

This tells Samba to use a separate log file for each machine

that connects

log file = /var/log/samba/log.%m

Cap the size of the individual log files (in KiB).

max log size = 1000

If you want Samba to only log through syslog then set the following

parameter to ‘yes’.

syslog only = no

We want Samba to log a minimum amount of information to syslog. Everything

should go to /var/log/samba/log.{smbd,nmbd} instead. If you want to log

through syslog you should set the following parameter to something higher.

syslog = 0

Do something sensible when Samba crashes: mail the admin a backtrace

panic action = /usr/share/samba/panic-action %d

####### Authentication #######

“security = user” is always a good idea. This will require a Unix account

in this server for every user accessing the server. See

/usr/share/doc/samba-doc/htmldocs/Samba3-HOWTO/ServerType.html

in the samba-doc package for details.

security = user

You may wish to use password encryption. See the section on

‘encrypt passwords’ in the smb.conf(5) manpage before enabling.

encrypt passwords = true

If you are using encrypted passwords, Samba will need to know what

password database type you are using.

passdb backend = tdbsam

obey pam restrictions = yes

This boolean parameter controls whether Samba attempts to sync the Unix

password with the SMB password when the encrypted SMB password in the

passdb is changed.

unix password sync = yes

For Unix password sync to work on a Debian GNU/Linux system, the following

parameters must be set (thanks to Ian Kahan <[email protected] for

sending the correct chat script for the passwd program in Debian Sarge).

passwd program = /usr/bin/passwd %u
passwd chat = Enter\snew\s\spassword:* %n\n Retype\snew\s\spassword:* %n\n password\supdated\ssuccessfully .

This boolean controls whether PAM will be used for password changes

when requested by an SMB client instead of the program listed in

‘passwd program’. The default is ‘no’.

pam password change = yes

This option controls how unsuccessful authentication attempts are mapped

to anonymous connections

map to guest = bad user

########## Domains ###########

Is this machine able to authenticate users. Both PDC and BDC

must have this setting enabled. If you are the BDC you must

change the ‘domain master’ setting to no

; domain logons = yes

The following setting only takes effect if ‘domain logons’ is set

It specifies the location of the user’s profile directory

from the client point of view)

The following required a [profiles] share to be setup on the

samba server (see below)

; logon path = \%N\profiles%U

Another common choice is storing the profile in the user’s home directory

(this is Samba’s default)

logon path = \%N%U\profile

The following setting only takes effect if ‘domain logons’ is set

It specifies the location of a user’s home directory (from the client

point of view)

; logon drive = H:

logon home = \%N%U

The following setting only takes effect if ‘domain logons’ is set

It specifies the script to run during logon. The script must be stored

in the [netlogon] share

NOTE: Must be store in ‘DOS’ file format convention

; logon script = logon.cmd

This allows Unix users to be created on the domain controller via the SAMR

RPC pipe. The example command creates a user account with a disabled Unix

password; please adapt to your needs

; add user script = /usr/sbin/adduser --quiet --disabled-password --gecos “” %u

This allows machine accounts to be created on the domain controller via the

SAMR RPC pipe.

The following assumes a “machines” group exists on the system

; add machine script = /usr/sbin/useradd -g machines -c “%u machine account” -d /var/lib/samba -s /bin/false %u

This allows Unix groups to be created on the domain controller via the SAMR

RPC pipe.

; add group script = /usr/sbin/addgroup --force-badname %g

########## Printing ##########

If you want to automatically load your printer list rather

than setting them up individually then you’ll need this

load printers = yes

lpr(ng) printing. You may wish to override the location of the

printcap file

; printing = bsd
; printcap name = /etc/printcap

CUPS printing. See also the cupsaddsmb(8) manpage in the

cupsys-client package.

; printing = cups
; printcap name = cups

############ Misc ############

Using the following line enables you to customise your configuration

on a per machine basis. The %m gets replaced with the netbios name

of the machine that is connecting

; include = /home/samba/etc/smb.conf.%m

Most people will find that this option gives better performance.

See smb.conf(5) and /usr/share/doc/samba-doc/htmldocs/Samba3-HOWTO/speed.html

for details

You may want to add the following on a Linux system:

SO_RCVBUF=8192 SO_SNDBUF=8192

socket options = TCP_NODELAY

The following parameter is useful only if you have the linpopup package

installed. The samba maintainer and the linpopup maintainer are

working to ease installation and configuration of linpopup and samba.

; message command = /bin/sh -c ‘/usr/bin/linpopup “%f” “%m” %s; rm %s’ &

Domain Master specifies Samba to be the Domain Master Browser. If this

machine will be configured as a BDC (a secondary logon server), you

must set this to ‘no’; otherwise, the default behavior is recommended.

domain master = auto

Some defaults for winbind (make sure you’re not using the ranges

for something else.)

; idmap uid = 10000-20000
; idmap gid = 10000-20000
; template shell = /bin/bash

The following was the default behaviour in sarge,

but samba upstream reverted the default because it might induce

performance issues in large organizations.

See Debian bug #368251 for some of the consequences of not

having this setting and smb.conf(5) for details.

; winbind enum groups = yes
; winbind enum users = yes

Setup usershare options to enable non-root users to share folders

with the net usershare command.

Maximum number of usershare. 0 (default) means that usershare is disabled.

; usershare max shares = 100

Allow users who’ve been granted usershare privileges to create

public shares, not just authenticated ones

usershare allow guests = yes

#======================= Share Definitions =======================

Un-comment the following (and tweak the other settings below to suit)

to enable the default home directory shares. This will share each

user’s home director as \server\username

;[homes]
; comment = Home Directories
; browseable = no

By default, the home directories are exported read-only. Change the

next parameter to ‘no’ if you want to be able to write to them.

; read only = yes

File creation mask is set to 0700 for security reasons. If you want to

create files with group=rw permissions, set next parameter to 0775.

; create mask = 0700

Directory creation mask is set to 0700 for security reasons. If you want to

create dirs. with group=rw permissions, set next parameter to 0775.

; directory mask = 0700

By default, \server\username shares can be connected to by anyone

with access to the samba server. Un-comment the following parameter

to make sure that only “username” can connect to \server\username

The following parameter makes sure that only “username” can connect

This might need tweaking when using external authentication schemes

; valid users = %S

Un-comment the following and create the netlogon directory for Domain Logons

(you need to configure Samba to act as a domain controller too.)

;[netlogon]
; comment = Network Logon Service
; path = /home/samba/netlogon
; guest ok = yes
; read only = yes
; share modes = no

Un-comment the following and create the profiles directory to store

users profiles (see the “logon path” option above)

(you need to configure Samba to act as a domain controller too.)

The path below should be writable by all users so that their

profile directory may be created the first time they log on

;[profiles]
; comment = Users profiles
; path = /home/samba/profiles
; guest ok = no
; browseable = no
; create mask = 0600
; directory mask = 0700

wins support = no
[printers]
comment = All Printers
browseable = no
path = /var/spool/samba
printable = yes
guest ok = no
read only = yes
create mask = 0700

Windows clients look for this share name as a source of downloadable

printer drivers

[print$]
comment = Printer Drivers
path = /var/lib/samba/printers
browseable = yes
read only = yes
guest ok = no

Uncomment to allow remote administration of Windows print drivers.

You may need to replace ‘lpadmin’ with the name of the group your

admin users are members of.

Please note that you also need to set appropriate Unix permissions

to the drivers directory for these users to have write rights in it

; write list = root, @lpadmin

A sample share for sharing your CD-ROM with others.

;[cdrom]
; comment = Samba server’s CD-ROM
; read only = yes
; locking = no
; path = /cdrom
; guest ok = yes

The next two parameters show how to auto-mount a CD-ROM when the

cdrom share is accesed. For this to work /etc/fstab must contain

an entry like this:

/dev/scd0 /cdrom iso9660 defaults,noauto,ro,user 0 0

The CD-ROM gets unmounted automatically after the connection to the

If you don’t want to use auto-mounting/unmounting make sure the CD

is mounted on /cdrom

; preexec = /bin/mount /cdrom
; postexec = /bin/umount /cdrom

[peppermint]
path = /home/allusers
available = yes
browsable = yes
public = yes
writable = no

[Music]
path = /home/allusers/Music
available = yes
browsable = yes
public = yes
writable = no

[/spoiler]

BTW, the
netbios name = peppermint
line doesn’t have to be peppermint, it can be whatever you want the PC to be called.

First make a backup of your smb.conf:

sudo cp /etc/samba/smb.conf /etc/samba/original-samba.conf

Now open your smb.conf for editing:

sudo leafpad /etc/smb.conf

make your changes, then SAVE the file… don’t forget to save.

now restart samba with:

sudo /etc/init.d/samba restart

Now your Linux PC should be available from your Windows PC’s Network Neighbourhood>View Workgroup Computers without asking for a password.

Tested in Peppermint, and XP


I also edited the hosts: line in /etc/nsswitch.conf to read:

[spoiler]# /etc/nsswitch.conf

Example configuration of GNU Name Service Switch functionality.

If you have the glibc-doc-reference' and info’ packages installed, try:

`info libc “Name Service Switch”’ for information about this file.

passwd: compat
group: compat
shadow: compat

hosts: files mdns4_minimal [NOTFOUND=return] dns mdns4
networks: files

protocols: db files
services: db files
ethers: db files
rpc: db files

netgroup: nis[/spoiler]

Though I don’t think this was necessary, I thought I’d better include it just in case.

Thanks for your help now working OK.

Have a good Weekend