Red Triangle with exclamation mark, next to wifi symbol, in ubuntu 13.04

My OS is up to date and my network is working fine,so I dont know why it is there, it usually takes time to appear after turning on laptop by it always returns even though im up to date, i have run sudo apt-get update and sudo apt-get upgrade.

When i click on the red triangle, and click on install up dates, nothing happins, when i click on show updates, my systems says it is updated, and help would be very much appreciate.

Hi awolfp, and welcome to the forum :slight_smile:

Are there any errors if you open a terminal and run:

sudo apt-get update

?

just run sudo apt-get update again,

W: Failed to fetch http://ppa.launchpad.net/ferramroberto/sopcast/ubuntu/dists/saucy/main/binary-i386/Packages 404 Not Found

W: Failed to fetch http://ppa.launchpad.net/stebbins/handbrake-releases/ubuntu/dists/saucy/main/binary-i386/Packages 404 Not Found

E: Some index files failed to download. They have been ignored, or old ones used instead.

The triangle has gone now, it will however return tomorrow around the same time.

Neither of those 2 PPA’s have any packages for Ubuntu 13.10 (saucy) … so those PPA’s need removing, or disabling.

Do you know how to do that ?

no i do not , any help would be very much appreciate, thank you

In your menu, look for

Software & Updates

and fire it up.

When it starts go to the “Other Software” tab.

Look for any entries that read:-

Index of /ferramroberto/sopcast/ubuntu saucy
and:-
Index of /stebbins/handbrake-releases/ubuntu saucy

and remove the ticks from the boxes at the beginning of those lines.

then click “Close

Now open a terminal and run:

sudo apt-get update

have those errors disappeared ?

Thanks a ton it work like and charm, and has resoled the issue, once again Thank you

You’re most welcome :slight_smile:

If you still get the red triangle tomorrow (which I doubt), let us know and we’ll figure out what else is causing it.

:wink: okay will do

Why don’t those PPAs have the appropriate packages? My guess is that those maintainers were compiling bleeding-edge versions of those packages, and don’t see the need for 13.04 (as Ubuntu have it covered)?

What was the reason for enabling those PPAs in the first place? I’m just a little concerned that disabling them may cause a secondary issue for you

Why would disabling the PPA’s cause an issue ?

:slight_smile: at this stage it seems all okay and working fine

For example - if you enable a PPA to get, say, the nightly build of Firefox, you might be on, say version 28, but the one in the repos might only be 25. If you remove the PPA, you won’t get any updates, until version 28 is eventually backported, if it even gets backported. This is a bit of a security risk, plus you’d miss out on any new features (presumably that is the reason you enabled that PPA in the first place)

Neither handbrake or sopcast are in the default repos.

I can honestly say I pretty muchh always disable PPA’s after installing the software I want from them and have never had any problems … in fact I consider that good practise, so I know exactly what was added by any PPA’s

For example - Lets say I add handbrake from a PPA (and leave the PPA enabled), how can I be sure the PPA owner doesn’t get a new pet project and suddenly add a version of dbus or lightdm he’s been toying with ?

I like to know what’s being added to my system … I can always re-enable the PPA at a later date to check for an update if I need one.

I consider enabled PPA’s more of a security risk … you never know what a PPA owner will add … I mean if during an update you got a new version of ssh would you notice where it had come from ?

Never really thought of it that way, kinda scary! I guess there’s no way of protecting against that either, makes me glad that I don’t use PPAs at all

Surprised that Handbrake isn’t in the default repos, considering how much software actually gets packaged. It’s pretty popular after all