Removing/changing password

Hello,
How to remove or change admin password in Peppermint.
And after installing peppermint OS in harddisk whenever i open some special software like software manager or file manager it ask for password every time so i want to open them without password is there a way to remove the password.

No there is no way to remove the password requirement (for administrative tasks) … if you want an insecure OS where system wide settings can be changed by anyone or any application, Windows is your best bet.

Are you still telling me that you’re an “ethical” hacker … yet security is of no concern ?

to change password, open a terminal and run:

sudo passwd

you will be prompted for your current password … then for the new password twice.

Quote:whenever i open some special software like software manager or file manager .

Software Manager …yes.

Does not ask me for a password when opening File Manager. :smiley:

Jocklad

@Jocklad

He has a dual boot setup … so I’m assuming file manager is asking for his password only when he tries to access the Windows partitions … it needs administrative permission to mount the partition.

Please stop asking again and again about ethical hacking and bla bla.
Im just learning working on Linux or particularly on peppermint that’s why i asked for “how to” about password.

So,i got what you said about eliminating or changing password but for the other part let me explain that in deep:
The thing is: “every time when i open some special utility on peppermint like software manager or file manager it prompts for entering password,its not the entering password that OS ask when you enter into desktop after a boot its when you open an important utility like i said e.g software manager”.

so i just want to remove this thing of asking password again and again now if you got my meaning then please tell if there is any way to stop this prompting.

Ubuntu (and Mint) use a “keyring” to store the password for the duration of the session, I’m not sure if Peppermint has this too?

Also, Windows drives can be mounted at boot, which negates the need for a password on access

@pendragon Why do you want to ’ hack ’ Peppermint ??
There are various ’ tutorials ’ on this site explaining how to install Peppermint 5 and with variations of how to dual boot.
The basic installation carries ample examples of programmes that can be used to gain an understanding of the Linux environment, when you become satisfied with the built in programmes, you can expand your horizons to embrace the various programmes you may have an interest in, the Moderator/s will be more than happy to help here.
Please learn to walk before you try running, I saw your post about ‘why is it taking so long to get an answer’ and was about to respond before it was removed.
This forum is an excellent centre for the Peppermint crew and the wider Linux world as well. Let’s keep it that way.

You say you want to “learn Linux” … accept the password prompt as part of that “learning” curve, it’s an integral part of Linux security (and one of the reasons you’ll not require anti-virus software), you CANNOT “learn Linux” without it.

NOTHING can be done outside your home folder without elevated privileges, not by you, or by any application run by you … so there is ZERO chance of you (or malicious software) installing something system wide without you meaning to, or ANY system settings being changed … this is a FUNDAMENTAL core Linux philosophy … remove it and not only do make the OS pretty much as insecure as Windows, but you’re no longer “learning Linux” are you ?

it’s NOT just there to annoy, Linux file “permissions” go a LOT deeper than just a few apps asking for your password (in fact it’s NOT the apps asking for permission, it’s the file system … you’re only being prompted for the password because the application is being run “by you” but is trying to access/edit a file outside your home folder that you don’t have permission to access/edit) … you CANNOT understand Linux without understanding file system permissions.

The benefits of the clear separation of who has permission to do what will become blatantly obvious as you learn Linux, it’s core philosophies, and why it’s considered to be such a secure OS.

In short … if you wanna “learn” Linux, learn “Linux”.

Here’s an earlier quote from one of the Peppermint devs (not specifically aimed at you, it was written in 2011):

Free advice: If you run Linux, your system is designed specifically for security. Don't be a moron and work against it, don't be an even bigger moron and bring the Windows sysadmin mentality to your Linux system, it's more mature than that.

I appologise for this as i though it would be an enabled option that is asking again and again and just disabling would do the job. i didn’t know it would be like hacking the OS.
As i’ve been a windows user for too long so didn’t get linux that well yet. Anyway thanks

@Mark:

I know Mint has this functionality (at least, LMDE MATE does), where the password dialog has an option to store in the “keyring” for the session. Are you aware of this, and could it work under Peppermint too?

@chemicalfan

Saves the password(s) for what ?

I’m not 100% sure of the gnome-keyring’s scope, but I gather it’s to allow a “master” password (usually the login password) to allow applications with their own (different) password to be opened with the master … so you don’t have to remember multiple passwords.

Somehow I doubt if it’s to remove the requirement for gksudo/pkexec/gksu/sudo password entering … or are you telling me that it allows you to NOT have to enter your root password ever (after login) … this would be immensely stupid.

Sorry, I only mention keyring as I’m sure the wording on the dialog says “store password in the keyring for this session”.

It comes up the first time gksudo is invoked, and then future gksudo actions don’t ask for the password until you reboot. A variation on the dialog is here:

http://forums.mate-desktop.org/viewtopic.php?f=17&t=1364

Edit - hotlink didn’t work, image is on this page - http://forums.mate-desktop.org/viewtopic.php?f=17&t=1364

No mention of “keyring” but that could be Mint-specific I guess. Anyway, the point was about getting the system to remember your password so you don’t have to type it. I don’t use the feature (too big a risk of breaking something in error whilst tired!), but it exists

Edit: That post talks about PolicyKit - I assume this is where that functionality comes from. As far as I can find, there isn’t an LXDE equivalent/binding under Ubuntu 14.04, it stops at 13.10 :frowning: Even then, it doesn’t appear to have the “password saving” functionality. It may be a case of using the Gnome version, but I expect that relies on GTK3 now, making it a mess :frowning:

Edit 2: That’s rubbish, it’s here - Ubuntu – Error. Point still stands about lack of functionality though - it doesn’t save passwords like MATE’s version.

Edit 3 (last one, I promise!): According to Arch’s info (https://www.archlinux.org/packages/community/i686/mate-polkit/), it doesn’t depend on any MATE packages apart from the build process (so, a binary could be installed on Peppermint without any major new dependencies). Theoretically of course, as it would be a big job trying to package it up!

Ahh, right "PolicyKit " is different to the “keyring”, though it may use it.

Yes you can suppress policykit authentication prompts for individual apps or system wide):

but SERIOUSLY read the disclaimer there … done incorrectly this is a MAJOR security risk, as is doing the same via sudoers.

Indeed different DE’s use poliicykit rules to set what does/doesn’t prompt for a password … my advice, LEAVE IT ALONE :slight_smile:

[EDIT]

BTW, lxpolkit (which is just the LXDE policykit rules/authentication agent) is NOT installed in Peppermint by default.

[EDIT2 - you’ve got me doing it now]

at least I don’t think it is … it’s not on my system, but oddly lxsession-default-apps does list it as the default policykit handler ???

Haha, sorry :smiley:

I can’t for the life of me find a screenshot of the Mint MATE password dialog, but it always appears the first time you do an action (like installing a package, or mounting a drive) - you have the option then to “suppress” it appearing again until a reboot.

Edit (sorry): Behaviour is the same (in Mint) as using “sudo” in the terminal - it only asks for a password the first time

Nah, nothing like that in Peppermint … but that’s “light and nimble” for you :wink:

BTW, installing lxpolkit appeared to do absolutely nothing ???

Tried to change password on Peppermint 5 with the"sudo passwd" command in terminal.

Terminal says password updated but can only log in with old password.

Jocklad.

try

sudo passwd

eg:

sudo passwd mark

and change to the same as the NEW password you entered before.

]hr]

Or change it through

menu > System Tools > Users and Groups

On the left highlight the user you want to change the password for, on the right click writing “Change…” next to “Password: Asked at login”

“sudo passwd ” worked fine Mark.

Password changed :slight_smile: :slight_smile: :slight_smile:

Jocklad

Mark,
I used this command to change the password on my Linux machine.

to change password, open a terminal and run:

sudo passwd

you will be prompted for your current password … then for the new password twice.
[/quote]
When I start the machine I put the new password in 4 times with no success, I then used my old password to log in ??.
Where have I gone wrong ?

[quote author=Mark Greaves (PCNetSpec) link=topic=12182.msg98865#msg98865 date=1415034372]
No there is no way to remove the password requirement (for administrative tasks) … if you want an insecure OS where system wide settings can be changed by anyone or any application, Windows is your best bet.

Are you still telling me that you’re an “ethical” hacker … yet security is of no concern ?

to change password, open a terminal and run:

sudo passwd

you will be prompted for your current password … then for the new password twice.
Mark can you delete this message