This is all a bit different!!!

Hi all.
Unlike most people in these forums I’ve no real gripes with windowz and have enjoyed many years using it - Dos - win3 - win95 etc… I stayed with xp pro as I think vista and win7 are awfull and a real pain to use.
I recently read somewhere that win8 will prevent other OS’s from running?? Well, I dont like vista or win7 and now win8 is supposedly going to tell me what I can or cant use on MY OWN pc so maybe its time to say good by to microsoft.
Anyways I’ve just downloaded the latest Ubuntu and have a few questions and comments.

I have two hdd’s installed both partitioned. Winxp on c and d (hdd1). I tried to install ubuntu onto hdd2 but it said something about no rootfiles found. I followed the instructions given by the installer but could not get around this problem so I ended up installing alongside xp on c. Is this an installer problem or is ubuntu limited to the primary drive only??

Ok, ubuntu installed and I discover I need drivers as the display would only give me 1024 res so I rebooted to xp with the intention of looking for the drivers. as soon as xp started to boot the fan on my graphics card instantly raced to full speed and even though my bloated xp takes a while to boot I dicovered the gpu temp was still at 78c and dropping. I’m wondering just how hot did it get while I was poking about in ubuntu. Could somebody please pass that on to the developers as a fried graphics card will be expensive.

I downloaded the drivers from nvidia booted back into ubuntu and realised this isnt the way ubuntu works :slight_smile: In windowz I’d simply click click the driver to install but ubuntu apparently wants to manage instalations for me and I should use Package Manager and this brings me to what I realy want to know. Have I got the correct flavour of linux? The main reason I dont like vista and 7 is because they want to control my pc and now I find that ubuntu seems to want to do the same. This is my first look at anything linux based and I realise I’ve got some learning ahead of me but my pc is mine and I want control. Do I realy HAVE to have an internet connection just to update a driver? I have a pc that I never give acces to the internet, how would I update the drivers on that?

Pro’s so far.
I absolutely love the way you can boot from the cd/dvd/usb.
I’m already in love with the multiple work space idea.
Even running alongside xp it seems faster.

Cons so far.
Dont like the package manager idea but maybe theres a way around this.
Just like vista and 7 I find I cannot band selected items with the mouse when using explorer or ubuntu’s version.


This was all written a bit hastily so to recap.

  1. Could somebody please pass on the information concerning the overheating graphics card when drivers havent been installed.
    My graphics card is an Nvidia GTX9800+ (BFG oc version)
    Phenom 2 quad core 955
    Gigabyte GA-MA770T-UD3

  2. Is there a version of linux that gives me more control over such things as driver instalation?

  3. Is there anything similar to windows explorer(pre vista) that allows banding with the mouse?

Also I’d like to use the 64bit version but the download page recommends the 32bit, is the 64 version stable?

  1. Could somebody please pass on the information concerning the overheating graphics card when drivers havent been installed.

This is a hardware issue - nothing to do with drivers or Linux.
Your machine needs to have sufficient cooling to cool your graphics card, irrespective of any software it may run.

  1. Is there a version of linux that gives me more control over such things as driver instalation?

You can have as much control as you want / can handle … but give you don’t know how to install drivers (yet) , you do sort of “need” the package manager.
All distro’s have package managers, all are different, all do the same thing … (!)
The only notably different version is Gentoo where each package is source only and every package is compiled from source “in situ” …

  1. Is there anything similar to windows explorer(pre vista) that allows banding with the mouse?

By “banding”, I can only assume you mean what I would refer to as “rubber band selection” … ??
In which case, the Ubuntu file manager does this … ??

Also I’d like to use the 64bit version but the download page recommends the 32bit, is the 64 version stable?

Yes, it’s the only one I use.

I have ~ 20 home-built Phenom systems based on ASUS motherboards.
If you just use standard components / cases and then run a 1100 at full-tilt, generally it will tend towards the high side of 60 degrees … (which is overheat …)
This is not a Linux issue, it’s just that Phenom chips generate a lot of heat when maxing out … same goes high end graphics cards.
Solution is to add better cooling.

It’s not difficult to find better CPU fans (generally) for workstations, but if you’re working with server cases with poor airflow, I’d recommend SUNON fans, which you can pick up from Farnell Electronics.
They come in standard sizes, I use the 80mm version in 2U cases ~ 1.3A.
Also useful if you want to build your own wind tunnel or want to stress test your sound meter … :wink:

UEFI will only be on new PC’s that carry the certified for Windows 8 logo … and even then, I would expect most manufacturers will include a switch to turn it off.

Nor are M$ likely to design Win8 to only run on hardware that supports UEFI, that would mean they can’t sell it on anything other than new hardware.

As for Linux… if the manufacturers don’t include a switch to turn off UEFI, a way round it will quickly be found :wink:

Is this an installer problem or is ubuntu limited to the primary drive only??

Not at all… but unless you are going to use the BIOS to select the boot device every time you wish to switch OS, then stage 1 of the GRUB bootloader must be on the MBR of first boot device… there are ways of making a Windows bootloader chainload GRUB, but it’s a bit involved.

There are multiple ways of achieving what you want.

a) install the GRUB bootloader to the MBR of the primary boot drive (Windows drive).

b) set the Linux drive as the primary boot device, and install GRUB to its MBR, and get it to chainload Windows.

c) have a bootloader on BOTH drives, and use the boot device selection screen to select the drive to boot.

I downloaded the drivers from nvidia booted back into ubuntu and realised this isnt the way ubuntu works .. [snip] .. The main reason I dont like vista and 7 is because they want to control my pc and now I find that ubuntu seems to want to do the same.

Though you can install software in Ubuntu by downloading it as either a .deb package (similar to an .exe in windows though not a binary executable), a script, or indeed downloading and compiling the source code… the main way to install software is through the package manager(s)… and there’s a good reason for that… software in the package mangers is stored in a central repository maintained by (in this case) Ubuntu, so can be tested for compatibility, and the distribution channels kept free of malicious code… this is actually one of the MAJOR strengths of Linux, and one the other OS’s would like to do if they could (indeed apple are doing it (badly) with itunes, and there have been attempts in the windows world, which failed due to software makers wanting to control there own distribution channels)… it is a strength, not control over you, there is nothing stopping you from installing by another method.

As Mad Penguin says, the amount (and method) of control you want is up to you… you can compile the whole OS from source code if you wish… or put together your very own Linux distribution… CHOICE is one of the things Linux will give you by the lorry load if you want it to, indeed a regular complaint leveled at the Linux world is there is too much choice :wink:

When you go to “Additional Drivers”, are you not being offered the nvidia drivers for your graphics card ?

What do you mean by “banding” in the file manager ?

64bit is just as stable as 32bit … there have been calls for Ubuntu to remove that warning from their front page (and I agree, they should).

The fact is that there is so much choice in Linux and as well as the package manager you have 34K items to install from the software center.

Thanks for the prompt attention.

Frustration led me to post so soon, should have stuck with it a bit longer :slight_smile:

Banding. I do a lot of file movement and prefer this method and have finaly worked out how to achieve this :slight_smile:

More control.
I do a bit of programming - vb6 - dabble in php - and sniffed around c so I like to be able to get at things and again I should stop being so impatient and take the time to find my way around :slight_smile: Any recomendations on something simmilar to vb6?

The over heating graphics card. I disagree that its a hardware problem. On instalation ubuntu alerted me that there was a driver problem. Whether in windows or even just sitting in the bios or dos the card does not overheat. The problem went away as soon as the driver package was installed.
Whether this is a hardware problem or not I think it should be looked into because the card DID overheat. To be 78c after a reboot(normaly 40 when idle) it must have been much higher than this before I rebooted. Calling NvCplGetThermalSettings shows max temp for my card to be 105c.
As mentioned the driver did sort this out but I’d hate to see someones card go pop and this is why I mentioned it.

Have to say I’m starting to like ubuntu more each time I use it.

Many many thanks guys.

PS. Got to do it all again now with the 64bit version :slight_smile:

I seem to vaguely remember an issue with the fan control on some nvidia cards, but Ubuntu should have immediately offered to install the correct (nvidia) drivers for you ???

[EDIT]

After further reading, the fan control/overheating issue was being caused by a bug in a specific driver from nVidia themselves and also (at the time) affected their Windows drivers… this driver AFAIK is no longer in the Ubuntu repositories, so quite what happened there… who knows.

[END EDIT]

Yeh, “Linux is not Windows”, and there is a bit of a learning curve, but stick at it and you’ll find its benefits quickly become self evident.

VB6…

Though I’m not a programmer… there are MANY IDE’s for Linux, maybe GAMBAS might be what you’re looking for ?
http://gambas.sourceforge.net/en/main.html
screenshots here:
http://gambasdoc.org/help/doc/screenshot?en&view

gambas2 is available in the package managers. :wink:

Still not 100% sure what you mean by “banding”, but if you mean group selection of files… it’s similar to how you do it in Windows… either drag a box, or use the Shift or Ctrl keys for multiple selections.

More control.

Any recomendations on something simmilar to vb6?

As Mark says, GAMBAS - very similar, but not the same …

The over heating graphics card. I disagree that its a hardware problem.

That’s fine, just be aware that I was stating a fact and not an opinion.
If your software can ‘break’ your hardware, then by definition your hardware is faulty.
If it were possible for ‘software’ (faulty or otherwise) to break hardware, it would be possible for Viruses to physically destroy computers … think about it for a second (!)

I must agree with that statement… your graphics card should have its own thermal cut-out which is independent of the drivers, if it doesn’t, or it doesn’t work leading to physical damage… that’s a hardware flaw.

The computer industry would be in a sorry state if software could physically damage hardware. :wink:

If drivers/software could kill your hardware, Virus/Malware writers would definitely exploit that, and by now Linux would be the OS of choice :wink:


@ BkS (and anyone else that’s interested)

I’ve split all the postings that sidetracked into a discussion on “UEFI secure boot” to here:
http://linuxforums.org.uk/general-discussion/uefi-secure-boot-discussion/