Upgrade mint 13 64bit MATE to mint 17 64bit MATE (Closed)

Any one have information on how to do this?

I can only find info about older upgrades on the mint website.

As always thanks in advance…

Do you have /home on a seperate partition?

No home is on the only partition…

Mint don’t officially support inline upgrades…

I “gather” you used to be able to just change the version of mint for all the repo’s in
/etc/apt/sources.list
and any PPA’s in the files in
/etc/apt/sources.list.d
then change the version in
/etc/lsb-release
then just do a normal “dist-upgrade”

That worked for me once Mint 8 → Mint 9

BUT, I have no idea if Mint have changed things recently … so doing the above would be AT YOUR OWN RISK

It’s not the recommended “official” way, but there is a procedure on the community Mint website for using apt-get to pull in the new packages. It is at your own risk though, as Mark says.

The official method, is to backup your documents etc, then do a fresh install over the top. You can’t backup the entire /home folder and restore it - I tried that from Mint 15 to 16, and it hosed the install (permission issues, and other bugs that I never got round to fixing…)

It’s a VERY good idea to backup all your documents etc, before playing around with any upgrades. In that case, even if you break it, you should be able to restore successfully into the new system (i.e. even if you don’t follow the official method, if you’ve got a backup of your files and you break it, you can fall back to the official method)

Thanks for your advice do not have much stored on this laptop… wanted to try it out before chancing my main desktop system.

Do you have a link to the “procedure on the community Mint website for using apt-get to pull in the new packages.”

Thanks…

Can’t say I have … at least not a link to the whole procedure of changing the repos/lsb-release/PPA’s

But what’s the output from:

cat /etc/apt/sources.list; for X in /etc/apt/sources.list.d/*; do echo; echo; echo "** $X:"; echo; cat $X; done

It’s out of date, but the procedure is the same - Linux Mint - Community

Just use the mint 17 sources rather than the ones listed in the guide. It’s not difficult, but the article gives a few reasons why Mint don’t recommend it, especially in the comments at the bottom

Edit - another good reason, is that any new packages introduced by Mint from 14 onwards won’t be installed at all. The package upgrade method simply upgrades existing packages - any new software that Mint have written since won’t be installed via this method. Stuff like mintdrivers, and certain new cinnamon features that have been packaged seperately. You have to manually install them using their package names and “apt-get install …”

Mark:

usertwo@usertwo-R59P-R60P-R61P ~ $ cat /etc/apt/sources.list; for X in /etc/apt/sources.list.d/*; do echo; echo; echo "** $X:"; echo; cat $X; done deb http://mintlinux.mirror.triple-it.nl/packages/ maya main upstream import deb-src http://mintlinux.mirror.triple-it.nl/packages/ maya main upstream import #Added by software-properties deb http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ precise main restricted universe multiverse deb http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ precise-updates main restricted universe multiverse deb http://security.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ precise-security main restricted universe multiverse deb http://archive.canonical.com/ubuntu/ precise partner # deb http://packages.medibuntu.org/ precise free non-free

deb Ubuntu - GetDeb precise-getdeb apps

deb Ubuntu - GetDeb precise-getdeb games

** /etc/apt/sources.list.d/birdie-team-stable-precise.list:

deb Index of /birdie-team/stable/ubuntu precise main
deb-src Index of /birdie-team/stable/ubuntu precise main

** /etc/apt/sources.list.d/birdie-team-stable-precise.list.save:

deb Index of /birdie-team/stable/ubuntu precise main
deb-src Index of /birdie-team/stable/ubuntu precise main

** /etc/apt/sources.list.d/jitsi.list:

THIS FILE IS AUTOMATICALLY CONFIGURED

You may comment out this entry, but any other modifications may be lost.

deb http://download.jitsi.org/deb unstable/

** /etc/apt/sources.list.d/jockey.list:

deb http://download.ebz.epson.net/dsc/op/stable/debian/ lsb3.2 main

** /etc/apt/sources.list.d/jockey.list.save:

deb http://download.ebz.epson.net/dsc/op/stable/debian/ lsb3.2 main

** /etc/apt/sources.list.d/libreoffice-ppa-precise.list:

deb Index of /libreoffice/ppa/ubuntu precise main
deb-src Index of /libreoffice/ppa/ubuntu precise main

** /etc/apt/sources.list.d/libreoffice-ppa-precise.list.save:

deb Index of /libreoffice/ppa/ubuntu precise main
deb-src Index of /libreoffice/ppa/ubuntu precise main

** /etc/apt/sources.list.d/local-repository.list:

deb file:///usr/share/local-repository binary/

** /etc/apt/sources.list.d/local-repository.list.save:

deb file:///usr/share/local-repository binary/

usertwo@usertwo-R59P-R60P-R61P ~ $

Right … in all those entries I’d guess you’d just change any mention of

maya —> qiana

and

precise → trusty

Then do a:

sudo apt-get update

then

sudo apt-get upgrade

then

sudo apt-get dist-upgrade

BUT seriously I probably wouldn’t recommend this … definitely not unless you have a backup of all data you cannot afford to loose.

I will do a back up and try the new mint 17 on a live USB first.

Thanks…

I tested mint 17 from a live USB and it seemed to work OK so after backing up the small amount of data on this laptop proceeded with the up grade 13 to 17.

I can report that it did not work on my computer though others have reported that it worked well. It would seem to be something to do with the make and type of computer.

Thus I have installed mint 17 64bit mate from the live USB.

This is the one thing about mint I do not like as you have to reinstall all the software that was installed from scratch…

Thanks for your assistance.

This is the one thing about mint I do not like as you have to reinstall all the software that was installed from scratch....
So, why don't you try LMDE (Mate or Cinnamon). It is a semi rolling release and should not need to be reinstalled. Ignore that part (it should have been removed ages ago):
Cons:
LMDE requires a deeper knowledge and experience with Linux, dpkg and APT.
Debian is a less user-friendly/desktop-ready base than Ubuntu. Expect some rough edges.</blockquote>

I will try out LMDE I think I tried it once before and it did not work well on the laptop.

The problem with LMDE, is that due to it’s update policy, it is inherently insecure. Updates from upstream are only issued in “Update Packs”, which come out roughly quarterly. If there is a security patch applied to an upstream package, you won’t get it until the update pack (all very Microsoft-like). You can change the sources to point to upstream directly (i.e. Debian Testing), but you’re then running a testing release, as opposed to a stable release. As much as I love Mint, I wouldn’t recommend LMDE for a daily use machine (it’s on my in-laws machine, but they only turn it on a couple of times a year!)

That is completely unfair on LMDE.
I have used it on my main machine from the first release until they dropped the XFCE version (then moved to SolydX which is also a semi rolling release) without any hitch.

Tried a live USB of one of the LMDE versions and have to say that it has resolved an issue with DOCKY that I have in mint 13 64bit.

I thought it was not as polished as the new mint 17 on my laptop but that still has the DOCKY issue.

I’m the same, although I jumped ship after running it for about 4 months, once I went a month with no updates at all (I didn’t follow Debian Testing). Thought the repos were broken, lol